Angst voor de dood / The fear of dying

Press/Media: Expert Comment

Description

Jolanda de Vries, GZ psycholoog ETZ Tilburg en hoogleraar Kwaliteit van Leven Tilburg University, ziet in haar werk in het ziekenhuis veel patiënten met de diagnose kanker en veel patiënten hebben een angst voor de dood. De diagnose kanker roept al angst op maar dat is ook woordkeus, want de diagnose chronisch obstructief longlijden in het laatste stadium geeft die angst niet. Mensen hebben de neiging niet te kijken naar een gunstige verwachting; 10-15% kans op verslechtering is wat mensen horen voor zichzelf, niet de 80-90% kans op verbetering. Omgaan met angst voor de dood is voor een patiënt en voor de directe omgeving niet hetzelfde. In de palliatieve fase, wel behandeling maar genezing is niet meer mogelijk, gaat de patiënt zich realiseren dat de dood onafwendbaar is maar is de partner of directe omgeving meer met het leven bezig “je blijft de behandelingen toch wel doen, je blijft toch wel bij mij!”. De dood wordt zo een taboe om over te praten voor een patiënt.

Jolanda de Vries, GZ psychologist ETZ Tilburg and Professor Quality of Life Tilburg University, sees in her work in the hospital lots of patients with the diagnosis cancer and many of them have a fear for dying. The diagnosis itself causes fear but that’s also a choice of words, the diagnosis chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the last stage does not give this fear. People have the tendency not to look at a positive prognosis for themselves; a 10-15% on a return of the disease is what people hear, not the 85-90% chance is does not. Surroundings are very important, because the patient is dealing with passing away soon or it might still take a while. Once a patient enters the so-called palliative stage where they receive treatment, but can't be cured, you see a difference between partners. The patient wants to deal with a possible death, the partner clings on to life “you keep on going with the treatment, you will stay with me”. Death becomes a taboo to talk about for a patient.

Period21 Oct 2016

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleAngst voor de dood / The fear of dying
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletTilburg University
    Media typeWeb
    Duration/Length/Size6.33 min.
    CountryNetherlands
    Date21/10/16
    DescriptionJolanda de Vries, GZ psycholoog ETZ Tilburg en hoogleraar Kwaliteit van Leven Tilburg University, ziet in haar werk in het ziekenhuis veel patiënten met de diagnose kanker en veel patiënten hebben een angst voor de dood.
    De diagnose kanker roept al angst op maar dat is ook woordkeus, want de diagnose chronisch obstructief longlijden in het laatste stadium geeft die angst niet.
    Mensen hebben de neiging niet te kijken naar een gunstige verwachting; 10-15% kans op verslechtering is wat mensen horen voor zichzelf, niet de 80-90% kans op verbetering.
    Omgaan met angst voor de dood is voor een patiënt en voor de directe omgeving niet hetzelfde. In de palliatieve fase, wel behandeling maar genezing is niet meer mogelijk, gaat de patiënt zich realiseren dat de dood onafwendbaar is maar is de partner of directe omgeving meer met het leven bezig “je blijft de behandelingen toch wel doen, je blijft toch wel bij mij!”.
    De dood wordt zo een taboe om over te praten voor een patiënt.


    Jolanda de Vries, GZ psychologist ETZ Tilburg and Professor Quality of Life Tilburg University, sees in her work in the hospital lots of patients with the diagnosis cancer and many of them have a fear for dying.
    The diagnosis itself causes fear but that’s also a choice of words, the diagnosis chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the last stage does not give this fear.
    People have the tendency not to look at a positive prognosis for themselves; a 10-15% on a return of the disease is what people hear, not the 85-90% chance is does not.
    Surroundings are very important, because the patient is dealing with passing away soon or it might still take a while. Once a patient enters the so-called palliative stage where they receive treatment, but can't be cured, you see a difference between partners. The patient wants to deal with a possible death, the partner clings on to life “you keep on going with the treatment, you will stay with me”.
    Death becomes a taboo to talk about for a patient.
    Producer/AuthorTilburg University
    URLhttps://youtu.be/7yA5idNkLDU
    PersonsJolanda de Vries