Return to work after common mental disorders

Press/Media: Expert Comment

Description

Researchers from Tranzo at Tilburg University in the Netherlands conducted research into the return to work process for employees who have been on sickness absence because of common mental disorders (CMDs).

The IOSH-funded study focused on common issues such as anxiety, depression, stress and adjustment disorders.

It was split into two parts: one with mental health and occupational health professionals, general practitioners and managers; the other with the workers themselves.

While the research was conducted in the context of the Dutch social security system, UK-based occupational health and medicine professionals have recognised many findings.

These findings show workers need help gaining self-awareness and regaining control, while the knowledge and skills of their supervisors should be strengthened. Personalised return-to-work plans involving good communication and assessment of each worker’s values, views and needs can also be helpful.

For more details on the study, visit http://www.iosh.co.uk/rtwmentalhealth

Period24 Oct 2017

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleReturn to work after common mental disorders
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletIOSH
    Media typeWeb
    Duration/Length/Size3.34 min.
    CountryNetherlands
    Date24/10/17
    DescriptionResearchers from Tranzo at Tilburg University in the Netherlands conducted research into the return to work process for employees who have been on sickness absence because of common mental disorders (CMDs).

    The IOSH-funded study focused on common issues such as anxiety, depression, stress and adjustment disorders.

    It was split into two parts: one with mental health and occupational health professionals, general practitioners and managers; the other with the workers themselves.

    While the research was conducted in the context of the Dutch social security system, UK-based occupational health and medicine professionals have recognised many findings.

    These findings show workers need help gaining self-awareness and regaining control, while the knowledge and skills of their supervisors should be strengthened. Personalised return-to-work plans involving good communication and assessment of each worker’s values, views and needs can also be helpful.

    For more details on the study, visit http://www.iosh.co.uk/rtwmentalhealth
    Producer/AuthorIOSH
    URLhttps://youtu.be/lfeuBjuugyQ
    PersonsEvelien Brouwers, Margot Joosen