A longitudinal study of allostatic load in later life

The role of sex, birth cohorts, and risk accumulation

Ioana van Deurzen, Bram Vanhoutte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Are challenging life courses associated with more wear and tear on the biological level? This study investigates this question from a life-course perspective by examining the influence of life-course risk accumulation on allostatic load (AL), considering the role of sex and birth cohorts. Using biomarker data collected over three waves (2004, 2008, and 2012) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (N = 3,824) in a growth curve framework , AL trajectories over a period of 8 years are investigated. Our results illustrate that AL increases substantially in later life. Men have higher AL than women, but increases are similar for both sexes. Older cohorts have both higher levels and a steeper increase of AL over time. Higher risk accumulation over the life course goes hand in hand with higher AL levels and steeper trajectories, contributing to the body of evidence on cumulative (dis)advantage processes in later life.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-442
JournalResearch on Aging
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

longitudinal study
wear and tear
evidence

Keywords

  • AGE
  • CHILDHOOD POVERTY
  • CUMULATIVE ADVANTAGE
  • GENDER
  • HEALTH DISPARITIES
  • INTRAINDIVIDUAL VARIABILITY
  • SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS
  • SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
  • STRESS
  • TRAJECTORIES
  • allostatic load
  • biomarkers
  • life course
  • risk accumulation
  • stress

Cite this

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title = "A longitudinal study of allostatic load in later life: The role of sex, birth cohorts, and risk accumulation",
abstract = "Are challenging life courses associated with more wear and tear on the biological level? This study investigates this question from a life-course perspective by examining the influence of life-course risk accumulation on allostatic load (AL), considering the role of sex and birth cohorts. Using biomarker data collected over three waves (2004, 2008, and 2012) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (N = 3,824) in a growth curve framework , AL trajectories over a period of 8 years are investigated. Our results illustrate that AL increases substantially in later life. Men have higher AL than women, but increases are similar for both sexes. Older cohorts have both higher levels and a steeper increase of AL over time. Higher risk accumulation over the life course goes hand in hand with higher AL levels and steeper trajectories, contributing to the body of evidence on cumulative (dis)advantage processes in later life.",
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author = "{van Deurzen}, Ioana and Bram Vanhoutte",
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language = "English",
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pages = "419--442",
journal = "Research on Aging",
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A longitudinal study of allostatic load in later life : The role of sex, birth cohorts, and risk accumulation. / van Deurzen, Ioana; Vanhoutte, Bram.

In: Research on Aging, Vol. 41, No. 5, 2019, p. 419-442.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A longitudinal study of allostatic load in later life

T2 - The role of sex, birth cohorts, and risk accumulation

AU - van Deurzen, Ioana

AU - Vanhoutte, Bram

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Are challenging life courses associated with more wear and tear on the biological level? This study investigates this question from a life-course perspective by examining the influence of life-course risk accumulation on allostatic load (AL), considering the role of sex and birth cohorts. Using biomarker data collected over three waves (2004, 2008, and 2012) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (N = 3,824) in a growth curve framework , AL trajectories over a period of 8 years are investigated. Our results illustrate that AL increases substantially in later life. Men have higher AL than women, but increases are similar for both sexes. Older cohorts have both higher levels and a steeper increase of AL over time. Higher risk accumulation over the life course goes hand in hand with higher AL levels and steeper trajectories, contributing to the body of evidence on cumulative (dis)advantage processes in later life.

AB - Are challenging life courses associated with more wear and tear on the biological level? This study investigates this question from a life-course perspective by examining the influence of life-course risk accumulation on allostatic load (AL), considering the role of sex and birth cohorts. Using biomarker data collected over three waves (2004, 2008, and 2012) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (N = 3,824) in a growth curve framework , AL trajectories over a period of 8 years are investigated. Our results illustrate that AL increases substantially in later life. Men have higher AL than women, but increases are similar for both sexes. Older cohorts have both higher levels and a steeper increase of AL over time. Higher risk accumulation over the life course goes hand in hand with higher AL levels and steeper trajectories, contributing to the body of evidence on cumulative (dis)advantage processes in later life.

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KW - SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS

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KW - STRESS

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KW - risk accumulation

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JO - Research on Aging

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