A longitudinal study of partners of deployed personnel from the Netherlands’ armed forces

M.D. Andres, R. Moelker, J.M.M.L. Soeters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We examined the longitudinal relationships among work–family conflict, general life stress, social isolation, and psychological distress of partners of deployed military personnel. Regression analyses revealed that psychological distress experienced in early stages of deployment predicted psychological distress at later stages of deployment. After controlling for the effects of earlier psychological distress, partners who reported higher levels of work–family conflict and social isolation reported higher levels of psychological distress, particularly within that stage of the deployment cycle. Finally, we found that reports of life stress influenced psychological distress experiences before deployment but not at any other time in the deployment cycle. (
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-288
JournalMilitary Psychology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Military Personnel
Netherlands
military
longitudinal study
personnel
social isolation
psychological stress
Military
regression
experience

Cite this

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A longitudinal study of partners of deployed personnel from the Netherlands’ armed forces. / Andres, M.D.; Moelker, R.; Soeters, J.M.M.L.

In: Military Psychology, Vol. 24, No. 3, 2012, p. 270-288.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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