A preliminary theory of dark network resilience

R.M. Bakker, J. Raab, H.B. Milward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

A crucial contemporary policy question for governments across the globe is how to cope with international crime and terrorist networks. Many such “dark” networks—that is, networks that operate covertly and illegally—display a remarkable level of resilience when faced with shocks and attacks. Based on an in-depth study of three cases (MK, the armed wing of the African National Congress in South Africa during apartheid; FARC, the Marxist guerrilla movement in Colombia; and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, LTTE, in Sri Lanka), we present a set of propositions to outline how shocks impact dark network characteristics (resources and legitimacy) and networked capabilities (replacing actors, linkages, balancing integration and differentiation) and how these in turn affect a dark network's resilience over time. We discuss the implications of our findings for policymakers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-62
JournalJournal of Policy Analysis and Management
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

resilience
guerrilla
ANC
Tamil
Sri Lanka
liberation
Colombia
apartheid
legitimacy
offense
Resilience
resources

Cite this

Bakker, R.M. ; Raab, J. ; Milward, H.B. / A preliminary theory of dark network resilience. In: Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. 2012 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 33-62.
@article{1284bca50bf445bbbd305b8dc26dfba7,
title = "A preliminary theory of dark network resilience",
abstract = "A crucial contemporary policy question for governments across the globe is how to cope with international crime and terrorist networks. Many such “dark” networks—that is, networks that operate covertly and illegally—display a remarkable level of resilience when faced with shocks and attacks. Based on an in-depth study of three cases (MK, the armed wing of the African National Congress in South Africa during apartheid; FARC, the Marxist guerrilla movement in Colombia; and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, LTTE, in Sri Lanka), we present a set of propositions to outline how shocks impact dark network characteristics (resources and legitimacy) and networked capabilities (replacing actors, linkages, balancing integration and differentiation) and how these in turn affect a dark network's resilience over time. We discuss the implications of our findings for policymakers.",
author = "R.M. Bakker and J. Raab and H.B. Milward",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1002/pam.20619",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "33--62",
journal = "Journal of Policy Analysis and Management",
issn = "0276-8739",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "1",

}

A preliminary theory of dark network resilience. / Bakker, R.M.; Raab, J.; Milward, H.B.

In: Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Vol. 31, No. 1, 2012, p. 33-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A preliminary theory of dark network resilience

AU - Bakker, R.M.

AU - Raab, J.

AU - Milward, H.B.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - A crucial contemporary policy question for governments across the globe is how to cope with international crime and terrorist networks. Many such “dark” networks—that is, networks that operate covertly and illegally—display a remarkable level of resilience when faced with shocks and attacks. Based on an in-depth study of three cases (MK, the armed wing of the African National Congress in South Africa during apartheid; FARC, the Marxist guerrilla movement in Colombia; and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, LTTE, in Sri Lanka), we present a set of propositions to outline how shocks impact dark network characteristics (resources and legitimacy) and networked capabilities (replacing actors, linkages, balancing integration and differentiation) and how these in turn affect a dark network's resilience over time. We discuss the implications of our findings for policymakers.

AB - A crucial contemporary policy question for governments across the globe is how to cope with international crime and terrorist networks. Many such “dark” networks—that is, networks that operate covertly and illegally—display a remarkable level of resilience when faced with shocks and attacks. Based on an in-depth study of three cases (MK, the armed wing of the African National Congress in South Africa during apartheid; FARC, the Marxist guerrilla movement in Colombia; and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, LTTE, in Sri Lanka), we present a set of propositions to outline how shocks impact dark network characteristics (resources and legitimacy) and networked capabilities (replacing actors, linkages, balancing integration and differentiation) and how these in turn affect a dark network's resilience over time. We discuss the implications of our findings for policymakers.

U2 - 10.1002/pam.20619

DO - 10.1002/pam.20619

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 33

EP - 62

JO - Journal of Policy Analysis and Management

JF - Journal of Policy Analysis and Management

SN - 0276-8739

IS - 1

ER -