A quasi-experimental study into the effects of naps and therapy glasses on fatigue and well-being

Marianne van Woerkom*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Aim: 

To investigate the effects of a napping facility and therapy glasses on fatigue and well-being at the end of the night shift. 

Background: 

Night shift work has adverse effects on fatigue and well-being. 

Methods: 

A quasi-experimental study was conducted, and data were collected on 243 night shifts of 95 nurses who had either access to a napping facility, therapy glasses, both facilities or no facilities. Multilevel analyses were conducted to predict fatigue and well-being. 

Results: 

Night shifts of nurses having access to both facilities were associated with less fatigue and more well-being. The use of therapy glasses related negatively to fatigue and positively to well-being. The use of the napping facility was not associated with fatigue and well-being. However, having slept while napping and sleeping time during napping were negatively associated with fatigue and positively associated with well-being. 

Conclusion: 

Therapy glasses and sleeping in a napping facility can be effective interventions in reducing the adverse effects of night shift work. Implications for Nursing Management: Therapy glasses seem an effective investment to facilitate the well-being of nurses. To enhance sleeping during napping, it is worthwhile to let nurses get accustomed to the napping facility and customize settings to personal preferences.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Nursing Management
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2021

Keywords

  • BRIGHT-LIGHT
  • EXPOSURE
  • HEALTH
  • IMPACT
  • MELATONIN
  • NIGHT-SHIFT
  • NURSES
  • PERFORMANCE
  • SLEEP
  • WORK
  • fatigue
  • light therapy
  • napping
  • night shift work
  • nursing
  • psychological well-being
  • quasi-experiment

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