Een remix van het strafproces?

Een ‘hiphop-theorie’ van het herstelrecht

Translated title of the contribution: A remix of criminal justice? : A 'hiphop theory' of restorative justice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientific

Abstract

Hip-hop and restorative justice may seem odd bedfellows, but according to Antony Pemberton they have more in common than many would assume. In the first place hip-hop shares a common history, at least with restorative justice's modern incarnations, spanning four decades, to become a similarly global phenomenon. Much of the social ecology shaping RJ is similar to hiphop. In addition hiphop's criticism of criminal justice almost goes without saying. Almost no source offers similar scathing critique of criminal justice and penal institutions as rap lyrics.
Pemberton further argues that rituals in hip-hop are connected with the need to deal with conflict. The way respect and disrespect can coincide in rap-battles might offer insights in the way similar dialectics can be navigated within restorative justice processes. The extent to which this is possible is necessarily limited. Pemberton finds that hip-hop – with the exception of graffiti- does not seem currently to criticize the key neo-liberal values of the American Zeitgeist. The much maligned chasm between the old-school and the new school can be situated in this observation. Where hip-hop, as a social movement, used to deploy the depiction of injustice as a means to underline the necessity of social change, the current motto appears to be rich or die tryin'. The life of the thug and the gangsta is depicted as the epitome of the American Dream. Here Pemberton sees grounds for a cautionary warning for restorative justice, which is nurtured by a similar neo-liberal undercurrent in a number of jurisdictions.




Original languageDutch
Pages (from-to)32-48
Number of pages17
JournalTijdschrift voor Herstelrecht
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

hip hop
justice
rap
Zeitgeist
graffiti
social ecology
social movement
dialectics
school
correctional institution
jurisdiction
social change
religious behavior
respect
criticism
history
Values

Keywords

  • hip-hop, herstelrecht, culturele criminologie, populaire cultuur, commodificatie

Cite this

@article{a505994b376e4c9ca7065f8424254a6b,
title = "Een remix van het strafproces?: Een ‘hiphop-theorie’ van het herstelrecht",
abstract = "Hip-hop and restorative justice may seem odd bedfellows, but according to Antony Pemberton they have more in common than many would assume. In the first place hip-hop shares a common history, at least with restorative justice's modern incarnations, spanning four decades, to become a similarly global phenomenon. Much of the social ecology shaping RJ is similar to hiphop. In addition hiphop's criticism of criminal justice almost goes without saying. Almost no source offers similar scathing critique of criminal justice and penal institutions as rap lyrics. Pemberton further argues that rituals in hip-hop are connected with the need to deal with conflict. The way respect and disrespect can coincide in rap-battles might offer insights in the way similar dialectics can be navigated within restorative justice processes. The extent to which this is possible is necessarily limited. Pemberton finds that hip-hop – with the exception of graffiti- does not seem currently to criticize the key neo-liberal values of the American Zeitgeist. The much maligned chasm between the old-school and the new school can be situated in this observation. Where hip-hop, as a social movement, used to deploy the depiction of injustice as a means to underline the necessity of social change, the current motto appears to be rich or die tryin'. The life of the thug and the gangsta is depicted as the epitome of the American Dream. Here Pemberton sees grounds for a cautionary warning for restorative justice, which is nurtured by a similar neo-liberal undercurrent in a number of jurisdictions.",
keywords = "hip-hop, herstelrecht, culturele criminologie, populaire cultuur, commodificatie",
author = "A. Pemberton",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.5553/TvH/1568654X2014014002004",
language = "Dutch",
volume = "14",
pages = "32--48",
journal = "Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht",
issn = "1568-654x",
number = "2",

}

Een remix van het strafproces? Een ‘hiphop-theorie’ van het herstelrecht. / Pemberton, A.

In: Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht, Vol. 14, No. 2, 2014, p. 32-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientific

TY - JOUR

T1 - Een remix van het strafproces?

T2 - Een ‘hiphop-theorie’ van het herstelrecht

AU - Pemberton, A.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Hip-hop and restorative justice may seem odd bedfellows, but according to Antony Pemberton they have more in common than many would assume. In the first place hip-hop shares a common history, at least with restorative justice's modern incarnations, spanning four decades, to become a similarly global phenomenon. Much of the social ecology shaping RJ is similar to hiphop. In addition hiphop's criticism of criminal justice almost goes without saying. Almost no source offers similar scathing critique of criminal justice and penal institutions as rap lyrics. Pemberton further argues that rituals in hip-hop are connected with the need to deal with conflict. The way respect and disrespect can coincide in rap-battles might offer insights in the way similar dialectics can be navigated within restorative justice processes. The extent to which this is possible is necessarily limited. Pemberton finds that hip-hop – with the exception of graffiti- does not seem currently to criticize the key neo-liberal values of the American Zeitgeist. The much maligned chasm between the old-school and the new school can be situated in this observation. Where hip-hop, as a social movement, used to deploy the depiction of injustice as a means to underline the necessity of social change, the current motto appears to be rich or die tryin'. The life of the thug and the gangsta is depicted as the epitome of the American Dream. Here Pemberton sees grounds for a cautionary warning for restorative justice, which is nurtured by a similar neo-liberal undercurrent in a number of jurisdictions.

AB - Hip-hop and restorative justice may seem odd bedfellows, but according to Antony Pemberton they have more in common than many would assume. In the first place hip-hop shares a common history, at least with restorative justice's modern incarnations, spanning four decades, to become a similarly global phenomenon. Much of the social ecology shaping RJ is similar to hiphop. In addition hiphop's criticism of criminal justice almost goes without saying. Almost no source offers similar scathing critique of criminal justice and penal institutions as rap lyrics. Pemberton further argues that rituals in hip-hop are connected with the need to deal with conflict. The way respect and disrespect can coincide in rap-battles might offer insights in the way similar dialectics can be navigated within restorative justice processes. The extent to which this is possible is necessarily limited. Pemberton finds that hip-hop – with the exception of graffiti- does not seem currently to criticize the key neo-liberal values of the American Zeitgeist. The much maligned chasm between the old-school and the new school can be situated in this observation. Where hip-hop, as a social movement, used to deploy the depiction of injustice as a means to underline the necessity of social change, the current motto appears to be rich or die tryin'. The life of the thug and the gangsta is depicted as the epitome of the American Dream. Here Pemberton sees grounds for a cautionary warning for restorative justice, which is nurtured by a similar neo-liberal undercurrent in a number of jurisdictions.

KW - hip-hop, herstelrecht, culturele criminologie, populaire cultuur, commodificatie

U2 - 10.5553/TvH/1568654X2014014002004

DO - 10.5553/TvH/1568654X2014014002004

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 32

EP - 48

JO - Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht

JF - Tijdschrift voor Herstelrecht

SN - 1568-654x

IS - 2

ER -