A structured science based needsfinding for infrastructure Living Labs

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperOther research output

Abstract

Living Labs increasingly enable innovations to be facilitated and implemented in a fast and efficient way. Key element is the active involvement of users. This case presents the needsfinding phase of an infrastructure Lab within the context of cycling. Since effectuation costs are high (roads and buildings are capital intensive), the need for focus (tackling the right user needs) is essential for funding of the lab. The needsfinding phase aims to generate user needs and requirements, which is researched by investigating bicycle commuting intention. This is tested using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). The results show convincingly that bicycle commuting intention can be explained by the variables of the TPB model (R2=.808). Within the context of a Living Lab, this model can be used as a very effective tool to instigate behavioral change. The insights can be generalized and are readily applicable in other areas.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages26
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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title = "A structured science based needsfinding for infrastructure Living Labs",
abstract = "Living Labs increasingly enable innovations to be facilitated and implemented in a fast and efficient way. Key element is the active involvement of users. This case presents the needsfinding phase of an infrastructure Lab within the context of cycling. Since effectuation costs are high (roads and buildings are capital intensive), the need for focus (tackling the right user needs) is essential for funding of the lab. The needsfinding phase aims to generate user needs and requirements, which is researched by investigating bicycle commuting intention. This is tested using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). The results show convincingly that bicycle commuting intention can be explained by the variables of the TPB model (R2=.808). Within the context of a Living Lab, this model can be used as a very effective tool to instigate behavioral change. The insights can be generalized and are readily applicable in other areas.",
author = "L.E.M. Savelkoul and M. Peutz",
year = "2016",
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A structured science based needsfinding for infrastructure Living Labs. / Savelkoul, L.E.M.; Peutz, M.

2016.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperOther research output

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Y1 - 2016

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AB - Living Labs increasingly enable innovations to be facilitated and implemented in a fast and efficient way. Key element is the active involvement of users. This case presents the needsfinding phase of an infrastructure Lab within the context of cycling. Since effectuation costs are high (roads and buildings are capital intensive), the need for focus (tackling the right user needs) is essential for funding of the lab. The needsfinding phase aims to generate user needs and requirements, which is researched by investigating bicycle commuting intention. This is tested using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). The results show convincingly that bicycle commuting intention can be explained by the variables of the TPB model (R2=.808). Within the context of a Living Lab, this model can be used as a very effective tool to instigate behavioral change. The insights can be generalized and are readily applicable in other areas.

M3 - Paper

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