A toy or a friend? Children's anthropomorphic beliefs about robots and how these relate to second-language word learning

Rianne van den Berghe, Mirjam de Haas, Ora Oudgenoeg-Paz, Emiel Krahmer, Josje Verhagen, Paul Vogt, Bram Willemsen, Jan de Wit, Paul Leseman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Abstract This study investigates the degree to which children anthropomorphize a robot tutor and whether this anthropomorphism relates to their vocabulary learning in a second-language (L2) tutoring intervention. With this aim, an anthropomorphism questionnaire was administered to 5-year-old children (N = 104) twice: prior to and following a seven-session L2 vocabulary training with a humanoid robot. On average, children tended to anthropomorphize the robot prior to and after the lessons to a similar degree, but many children changed their attributed anthropomorphic features. Boys anthropomorphized the robot less after the lessons than girls. Moreover, there was a weak but significant positive correlation between anthropomorphism as measured before the lessons and scores on a word-knowledge post-test administered the day after the last lesson. There was also a weak but significant positive correlation between the change in anthropomorphism over time and scores on a word-knowledge post-test administered approximately 2 weeks after the last lesson. Our results underscore the need to manage children's expectations in robot-assisted education. Also, future research could explore adaptations to individual children's expectations in child-robot interactions.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Computer Assisted Learning
Volumen/a
Issue numbern/a
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Sep 2020

Keywords

  • anthropomorphism
  • child-robot interaction
  • educational robots
  • robot tutoring
  • second-language learning

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A toy or a friend? Children's anthropomorphic beliefs about robots and how these relate to second-language word learning'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this