Adolescent perceptions of parental privacy invasion and adolescent secrecy: An illustration of Simpson's paradox

Evelien Dietvorst*, Marieke Hiemstra, Manon H J Hillegers, Loes Keijsers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)
32 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Adolescents' secrecy is intertwined with perception of parents' behaviors as acts of privacy invasion. It is currently untested, however, how this transactional process operates at the within-person level-where these causal processes take place. Dutch adolescents (n = 244, Mage = 13.84, 38.50% boys) reported three times on perceived parental privacy invasion and secrecy. Cross-lagged panel models (CLPM) confirmed earlier findings. Privacy invasion predicted increased secrecy, but a reverse effect was found from increased secrecy to increased privacy invasion. Controlling for confounding positive group-level associations with a novel random intercept CLPM, negative within-person associations were found. Higher levels of secrecy predicted lower levels of privacy invasive behaviors at the within-person level. These opposing findings within- versus between-persons illustrate a Simpson's paradox.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2081-2090
JournalChild Development
Volume89
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • CHILD
  • DISCLOSURE
  • KNOWLEDGE

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Adolescent perceptions of parental privacy invasion and adolescent secrecy: An illustration of Simpson's paradox'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this