Aerobic interval training and continuous training equally improve aerobic exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease: The SAINTEX-CAD study

V. Conraads, N. Pattyn, C. de Maeyer, P. Beckers, E. Coeckelberghs, V.A. Cornelissen, J. Denollet, G. Frederix, K. Goetschalckx, V.Y. Hoymans, N. Possemiers, D. Schepers, B. Shivalkar, J.U. Voigt, E.M. van Craenenbroeck, L. Vanhees

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Abstract

Background
Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation increases peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), which is an important predictor of mortality in cardiac patients. However, it remains unclear which exercise characteristics are most effective for improving peak VO2 in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Proof of concept papers comparing Aerobic Interval Training (AIT) and Moderate Continuous Training (MCT) were conducted in small sample sizes and findings were inconsistent and heterogeneous. Therefore, we aimed to compare the effects of AIT and Aerobic Continuous Training (ACT) on peak VO2, peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety, in a large multicentre study.
Methods
Two-hundred CAD patients (LVEF > 40%, 90% men, mean age 58.4 ± 9.1 years) were randomized to a supervised 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme of three weekly sessions of either AIT (90–95% of peak heart rate (HR)) or ACT (70–75% of peak HR) on a bicycle. Primary outcome was peak VO2; secondary outcomes were peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety.
Results
Peak VO2 (ml/kg/min) increased significantly in both groups (AIT 22.7 ± 17.6% versus ACT 20.3 ± 15.3%; p-time < 0.001). In addition, flow-mediated dilation (AIT +34.1% (range –69.8 to 646%) versus ACT +7.14% (range –66.7 to 503%); p-time < 0.001) quality of life and some other cardiovascular risk factors including resting diastolic blood pressure and HDL-C improved significantly after training. Improvements were equal for both training interventions.
Conclusions
Contrary to earlier smaller trials, we observed similar improvements in exercise capacity and peripheral endothelial function following AIT and ACT in a large population of CAD patients.KeywordsExercise intensity, Training modality, Coronary artery disease, Secondary preventionCardiac rehabilitationEndothelial function
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-210
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume179
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Exercise
Multicenter Studies
Dilatation
Oxygen
Cardiac Rehabilitation

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Conraads, V. ; Pattyn, N. ; de Maeyer, C. ; Beckers, P. ; Coeckelberghs, E. ; Cornelissen, V.A. ; Denollet, J. ; Frederix, G. ; Goetschalckx, K. ; Hoymans, V.Y. ; Possemiers, N. ; Schepers, D. ; Shivalkar, B. ; Voigt, J.U. ; van Craenenbroeck, E.M. ; Vanhees, L. / Aerobic interval training and continuous training equally improve aerobic exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease : The SAINTEX-CAD study. In: International Journal of Cardiology. 2015 ; Vol. 179. pp. 203-210.
@article{4eaea18edae94a49a8cfce825bba9ed2,
title = "Aerobic interval training and continuous training equally improve aerobic exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease: The SAINTEX-CAD study",
abstract = "BackgroundExercise-based cardiac rehabilitation increases peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), which is an important predictor of mortality in cardiac patients. However, it remains unclear which exercise characteristics are most effective for improving peak VO2 in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Proof of concept papers comparing Aerobic Interval Training (AIT) and Moderate Continuous Training (MCT) were conducted in small sample sizes and findings were inconsistent and heterogeneous. Therefore, we aimed to compare the effects of AIT and Aerobic Continuous Training (ACT) on peak VO2, peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety, in a large multicentre study.MethodsTwo-hundred CAD patients (LVEF > 40{\%}, 90{\%} men, mean age 58.4 ± 9.1 years) were randomized to a supervised 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme of three weekly sessions of either AIT (90–95{\%} of peak heart rate (HR)) or ACT (70–75{\%} of peak HR) on a bicycle. Primary outcome was peak VO2; secondary outcomes were peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety.ResultsPeak VO2 (ml/kg/min) increased significantly in both groups (AIT 22.7 ± 17.6{\%} versus ACT 20.3 ± 15.3{\%}; p-time < 0.001). In addition, flow-mediated dilation (AIT +34.1{\%} (range –69.8 to 646{\%}) versus ACT +7.14{\%} (range –66.7 to 503{\%}); p-time < 0.001) quality of life and some other cardiovascular risk factors including resting diastolic blood pressure and HDL-C improved significantly after training. Improvements were equal for both training interventions.ConclusionsContrary to earlier smaller trials, we observed similar improvements in exercise capacity and peripheral endothelial function following AIT and ACT in a large population of CAD patients.KeywordsExercise intensity, Training modality, Coronary artery disease, Secondary preventionCardiac rehabilitationEndothelial function",
author = "V. Conraads and N. Pattyn and {de Maeyer}, C. and P. Beckers and E. Coeckelberghs and V.A. Cornelissen and J. Denollet and G. Frederix and K. Goetschalckx and V.Y. Hoymans and N. Possemiers and D. Schepers and B. Shivalkar and J.U. Voigt and {van Craenenbroeck}, E.M. and L. Vanhees",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.10.155",
language = "English",
volume = "179",
pages = "203--210",
journal = "International Journal of Cardiology",
issn = "0167-5273",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

Conraads, V, Pattyn, N, de Maeyer, C, Beckers, P, Coeckelberghs, E, Cornelissen, VA, Denollet, J, Frederix, G, Goetschalckx, K, Hoymans, VY, Possemiers, N, Schepers, D, Shivalkar, B, Voigt, JU, van Craenenbroeck, EM & Vanhees, L 2015, 'Aerobic interval training and continuous training equally improve aerobic exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease: The SAINTEX-CAD study', International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 179, pp. 203-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.10.155

Aerobic interval training and continuous training equally improve aerobic exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease : The SAINTEX-CAD study. / Conraads, V.; Pattyn, N.; de Maeyer, C.; Beckers, P.; Coeckelberghs, E.; Cornelissen, V.A.; Denollet, J.; Frederix, G.; Goetschalckx, K.; Hoymans, V.Y.; Possemiers, N.; Schepers, D.; Shivalkar, B.; Voigt, J.U.; van Craenenbroeck, E.M.; Vanhees, L.

In: International Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 179, 2015, p. 203-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Aerobic interval training and continuous training equally improve aerobic exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease

T2 - The SAINTEX-CAD study

AU - Conraads, V.

AU - Pattyn, N.

AU - de Maeyer, C.

AU - Beckers, P.

AU - Coeckelberghs, E.

AU - Cornelissen, V.A.

AU - Denollet, J.

AU - Frederix, G.

AU - Goetschalckx, K.

AU - Hoymans, V.Y.

AU - Possemiers, N.

AU - Schepers, D.

AU - Shivalkar, B.

AU - Voigt, J.U.

AU - van Craenenbroeck, E.M.

AU - Vanhees, L.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - BackgroundExercise-based cardiac rehabilitation increases peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), which is an important predictor of mortality in cardiac patients. However, it remains unclear which exercise characteristics are most effective for improving peak VO2 in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Proof of concept papers comparing Aerobic Interval Training (AIT) and Moderate Continuous Training (MCT) were conducted in small sample sizes and findings were inconsistent and heterogeneous. Therefore, we aimed to compare the effects of AIT and Aerobic Continuous Training (ACT) on peak VO2, peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety, in a large multicentre study.MethodsTwo-hundred CAD patients (LVEF > 40%, 90% men, mean age 58.4 ± 9.1 years) were randomized to a supervised 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme of three weekly sessions of either AIT (90–95% of peak heart rate (HR)) or ACT (70–75% of peak HR) on a bicycle. Primary outcome was peak VO2; secondary outcomes were peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety.ResultsPeak VO2 (ml/kg/min) increased significantly in both groups (AIT 22.7 ± 17.6% versus ACT 20.3 ± 15.3%; p-time < 0.001). In addition, flow-mediated dilation (AIT +34.1% (range –69.8 to 646%) versus ACT +7.14% (range –66.7 to 503%); p-time < 0.001) quality of life and some other cardiovascular risk factors including resting diastolic blood pressure and HDL-C improved significantly after training. Improvements were equal for both training interventions.ConclusionsContrary to earlier smaller trials, we observed similar improvements in exercise capacity and peripheral endothelial function following AIT and ACT in a large population of CAD patients.KeywordsExercise intensity, Training modality, Coronary artery disease, Secondary preventionCardiac rehabilitationEndothelial function

AB - BackgroundExercise-based cardiac rehabilitation increases peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), which is an important predictor of mortality in cardiac patients. However, it remains unclear which exercise characteristics are most effective for improving peak VO2 in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Proof of concept papers comparing Aerobic Interval Training (AIT) and Moderate Continuous Training (MCT) were conducted in small sample sizes and findings were inconsistent and heterogeneous. Therefore, we aimed to compare the effects of AIT and Aerobic Continuous Training (ACT) on peak VO2, peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety, in a large multicentre study.MethodsTwo-hundred CAD patients (LVEF > 40%, 90% men, mean age 58.4 ± 9.1 years) were randomized to a supervised 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme of three weekly sessions of either AIT (90–95% of peak heart rate (HR)) or ACT (70–75% of peak HR) on a bicycle. Primary outcome was peak VO2; secondary outcomes were peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety.ResultsPeak VO2 (ml/kg/min) increased significantly in both groups (AIT 22.7 ± 17.6% versus ACT 20.3 ± 15.3%; p-time < 0.001). In addition, flow-mediated dilation (AIT +34.1% (range –69.8 to 646%) versus ACT +7.14% (range –66.7 to 503%); p-time < 0.001) quality of life and some other cardiovascular risk factors including resting diastolic blood pressure and HDL-C improved significantly after training. Improvements were equal for both training interventions.ConclusionsContrary to earlier smaller trials, we observed similar improvements in exercise capacity and peripheral endothelial function following AIT and ACT in a large population of CAD patients.KeywordsExercise intensity, Training modality, Coronary artery disease, Secondary preventionCardiac rehabilitationEndothelial function

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.10.155

DO - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.10.155

M3 - Article

VL - 179

SP - 203

EP - 210

JO - International Journal of Cardiology

JF - International Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0167-5273

ER -