Age differences in emotional responses to monetary losses and gains

Wandi Bruine de Bruin*, Marijke van Putten, Robin van Emden, JoNell Strough

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

People of all ages face events that threaten their well-being, but theories of aging posit that older adults will cope better. In a gamble with randomly assigned losses (vs. gains), older adults reported relatively less negative and more positive emotions than younger adults, especially after losses (vs. gains). Avoiding preoccupation with negative thoughts was more likely among older (vs. younger) adults and was related to less negative emotions after losses (vs. gains). A focus on limited time was associated with more positive emotions across all participants. Our findings may inform interventions that aim to promote emotional well-being across all ages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)413-418
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • emotion regulation
  • action control scale
  • gamble
  • losses
  • aging
  • FUTURE TIME PERSPECTIVE
  • STATE ORIENTATION
  • OLDER-ADULTS
  • LIFE-SPAN
  • SUNK-COST
  • AFFECTIVE EXPERIENCE
  • POSITIVE EMOTIONS
  • PSYCHOLOGY
  • DECISIONS
  • YOUNGER

Cite this

de Bruin, Wandi Bruine ; van Putten, Marijke ; van Emden, Robin ; Strough, JoNell. / Age differences in emotional responses to monetary losses and gains. In: Psychology and Aging. 2018 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 413-418.
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author = "{de Bruin}, {Wandi Bruine} and {van Putten}, Marijke and {van Emden}, Robin and JoNell Strough",
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Age differences in emotional responses to monetary losses and gains. / de Bruin, Wandi Bruine; van Putten, Marijke; van Emden, Robin; Strough, JoNell.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 33, No. 3, 2018, p. 413-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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