An ABC of nonrenewable–renewable resource interactions

Antibiotics, biofuels, carbon decay, expropriation, forestry, …

J.B. Lasserre, Sjak A. Smulders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

When there is a larger scope for replacing non-renewable resource use by renewable resources, resource depletion can be more easily avoided. However institutional failures may prevent this advantage to materialize. We offer a unified framework showing how this insight applies to the following highly different situations analyzed in six different papers. First, a more parsimonious use of Antibiotics may reduce the decay of antibiotic efficacy. Second, biofuels introduced in energy supply allow for reduced energy prices and fossil depletion. Third, when a larger fraction of carbon decays, a larger part of fossil reserves can be exploited. Fourth, limiting disruption of the climate enhances carbon decay. Fifth, expropriation of harvest slows down depletion, while free access to a resource accelerates it. Sixth, forest cover depletion is slowed down when trees grow faster.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)558-571
JournalResource and Energy Economics
Volume35
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Biofuels
Resources
Decay
Antibiotics
Carbon
Depletion
Forestry
Expropriation
Interaction
Climate
Non-renewable resources
Resource use
Harvest
Efficacy
Disruption
Renewable resources
Resource depletion
Energy
Energy prices

Cite this

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title = "An ABC of nonrenewable–renewable resource interactions: Antibiotics, biofuels, carbon decay, expropriation, forestry, …",
abstract = "When there is a larger scope for replacing non-renewable resource use by renewable resources, resource depletion can be more easily avoided. However institutional failures may prevent this advantage to materialize. We offer a unified framework showing how this insight applies to the following highly different situations analyzed in six different papers. First, a more parsimonious use of Antibiotics may reduce the decay of antibiotic efficacy. Second, biofuels introduced in energy supply allow for reduced energy prices and fossil depletion. Third, when a larger fraction of carbon decays, a larger part of fossil reserves can be exploited. Fourth, limiting disruption of the climate enhances carbon decay. Fifth, expropriation of harvest slows down depletion, while free access to a resource accelerates it. Sixth, forest cover depletion is slowed down when trees grow faster.",
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An ABC of nonrenewable–renewable resource interactions : Antibiotics, biofuels, carbon decay, expropriation, forestry, …. / Lasserre, J.B.; Smulders, Sjak A.

In: Resource and Energy Economics, Vol. 35, No. 4, 2013, p. 558-571.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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