An assisted structured reflection on life events and life goals in advanced cancer patients: Outcomes of a randomized controlled trial (Life InSight Application (LISA) study)

Renske Kruizinga, Michael Scherer-Rath, Johannes Bam Schilderman, Iris D Hartog, Jacoba Pm Van Der Loos, Hantie P Kotzé, Anneke M Westermann, Heinz-Josef Klümpen, Francesco Kortekaas, Cecile Grootscholten, Frans Bossink, Jolanda Schrama, Willem Van De Vrande, Natascha Awp Schrama, Willem Blokland, Filip Yfl De Vos, Annemieke Kuin, Wim G Meijer, Martijn Gh Van Oijen, Mirjam Ag SprangersHanneke Wm Van Laarhoven

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:: Diagnosis and treatment of incurable cancer as a life-changing experience evokes difficult existential questions.

    AIM:: A structured reflection could improve patients' quality of life and spiritual well-being. We developed an interview model on life events and ultimate life goals and performed a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect thereof on quality of life and spiritual well-being.

    DESIGN:: The intervention group had two consultations with a spiritual counselor. The control group received care as usual. EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL and the FACIT-sp were administered at baseline and 2 and 4 months after baseline. Linear mixed model analysis was performed to test between-group differences over time.

    PARTICIPANTS:: Adult patients with incurable cancer and a life expectancy ⩾6 months were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention or control group.

    RESULTS:: A total of 153 patients from six different hospitals were included: 77 in the intervention group and 76 in the control group. Quality of life and spiritual well-being did not significantly change over time between groups. The experience of Meaning/Peace was found to significantly influence quality of life ( β = 0.52, adj. R2 = 0.26) and satisfaction with life ( β = 0.61, adj. R2 = 0.37).

    CONCLUSION:: Although our newly developed interview model was well perceived by patients, we were not able to demonstrate a significant difference in quality of life and spiritual well-being between groups. Future interventions by spiritual counselors aimed at improving quality of life, and spiritual well-being should focus on the provision of sources of meaning and peace.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)221-231
    Number of pages11
    JournalPalliative Medicine
    Volume33
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

    Keywords

    • ANXIETY
    • CONTINGENCY
    • DEPRESSION
    • EXPERIENCE
    • NETHERLANDS
    • Oncology
    • PALLIATIVE CARE
    • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
    • RELIGION
    • SPIRITUAL CARE
    • SUPPORTIVE CARE
    • palliative care
    • randomized controlled trials
    • spiritual care
    • spiritual care givers
    • spirituality

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'An assisted structured reflection on life events and life goals in advanced cancer patients: Outcomes of a randomized controlled trial (Life InSight Application (LISA) study)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this