An Investigation of Short-Term Longitudinal Associations Between Social Anxiety and Victimization and Perpetration of Traditional Bullying and Cyberbullying

Sara Pabian*, Heidi Vandebosch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Previous research has suggested that social anxiety is associated with victimization and perpetration of (cyber)bullying. The direction and causality of this relationship has not yet been empirically supported for both traditional and cyberbullying involvement. This study examined short-term longitudinal associations between feelings of social anxiety and involvement in traditional bullying and cyberbullying among 2128 adolescents aged 10-17 (56.6 % girls). A cross-lagged panel analysis provided evidence for the contribution of social anxiety to later victimization of bullying, both on- and off-line. The possibility of a reciprocal relationship was also examined, although it was not supported. Furthermore, longitudinal bidirectional relationships between social anxiety and the perpetration of bullying were investigated. Only one significant longitudinal association was found: the perpetration of traditional bullying predicted subsequent higher levels of social anxiety. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)328-339
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Traditional bullying
  • Cyberbullying
  • Social anxiety
  • Adolescents
  • Cross-lagged panel model
  • CYBER-AGGRESSION
  • PEER RELATIONS
  • SCHOOL
  • CHILDHOOD
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • SELF
  • PREDICTORS
  • HEALTH
  • IMPACT

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