An RCT of dating matters

Effects on teen dating violence and relationship behaviors

Phyllis Holditch Niolon, Alana M. Vivolo-kantor, Allison J. Tracy, Natasha E. Latzman, Todd D. Little, Sarah Degue, Kyle M. Lang, Lianne Fuino Estefan, Sharon R. Ghazarian, Wendy Li Kamwa Mcintosh, Bruce Taylor, Linda L. Johnson, Henrietta Kuoh, Tessa Burton, Beverly Fortson, Elizabeth A. Mumford, Shannon C. Nelson, Hannah Joseph, Linda Anne Valle, Andra Teten Tharp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction
Teen dating violence is a serious public health problem with few effective prevention strategies. This study examines whether the Dating Matters comprehensive prevention model, compared with a standard of care intervention, prevented negative relationship behaviors and promoted positive relationship behaviors.
Study design
This longitudinal, cluster-RCT compared the effectiveness of Dating Matters with standard of care across middle school. Standard of care was an evidence-based teen dating violence prevention curriculum (Safe Dates) implemented in eighth grade.
Setting/participants
Forty-six middle schools in high-risk urban neighborhoods in four U.S. cities were randomized. Schools lost to follow-up were replaced with new schools, which were independently randomized (71% school retention). Students were surveyed in fall and spring of sixth, seventh, and eighth grades (2012–2016). The analysis sample includes students from schools implementing Dating Matters or standard of care for >2 years who started sixth grade in the fall of 2012 or 2013 and had dated (N=2,349 students, mean age 12 years, 49% female, and 55% black, non-Hispanic, 28% Hispanic, 17% other).
Intervention
Dating Matters is a comprehensive, multicomponent prevention model including classroom-delivered programs for sixth to eighth graders, training for parents of sixth to eighth graders, educator training, a youth communications program, and local health department activities to assess capacity and track teen dating violence–related policy and data.
Main outcome measures
Self-reported teen dating violence perpetration and victimization, use of negative conflict resolution strategies, and positive relationship skills were examined as outcomes. Imputation and analyses were conducted in 2017.
Results
Latent panel models demonstrated significant program effects for three of four outcomes; Dating Matters students reported 8.43% lower teen dating violence perpetration, 9.78% lower teen dating violence victimization, and 5.52% lower use of negative conflict resolution strategies, on average across time points and cohorts, than standard of care students. There were no significant effects on positive relationship behaviors.
Conclusions
Dating Matters demonstrates comparative effectiveness, through middle school, for reducing unhealthy relationship behaviors, such as teen dating violence and use of negative conflict resolution strategies, relative to the standard of care intervention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-23
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Crime Victims
Curriculum
Parents
Communication

Keywords

  • COMMUNITY VIOLENCE
  • CONFLICT
  • EXPOSURE
  • PREVENTION PROGRAM
  • SAFE DATES
  • VICTIMIZATION
  • YOUTH

Cite this

Niolon, P. H., Vivolo-kantor, A. M., Tracy, A. J., Latzman, N. E., Little, T. D., Degue, S., ... Tharp, A. T. (2019). An RCT of dating matters: Effects on teen dating violence and relationship behaviors. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 57(1), 13-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2019.02.022
Niolon, Phyllis Holditch ; Vivolo-kantor, Alana M. ; Tracy, Allison J. ; Latzman, Natasha E. ; Little, Todd D. ; Degue, Sarah ; Lang, Kyle M. ; Estefan, Lianne Fuino ; Ghazarian, Sharon R. ; Mcintosh, Wendy Li Kamwa ; Taylor, Bruce ; Johnson, Linda L. ; Kuoh, Henrietta ; Burton, Tessa ; Fortson, Beverly ; Mumford, Elizabeth A. ; Nelson, Shannon C. ; Joseph, Hannah ; Valle, Linda Anne ; Tharp, Andra Teten. / An RCT of dating matters : Effects on teen dating violence and relationship behaviors. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 57, No. 1. pp. 13-23.
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title = "An RCT of dating matters: Effects on teen dating violence and relationship behaviors",
abstract = "IntroductionTeen dating violence is a serious public health problem with few effective prevention strategies. This study examines whether the Dating Matters comprehensive prevention model, compared with a standard of care intervention, prevented negative relationship behaviors and promoted positive relationship behaviors.Study designThis longitudinal, cluster-RCT compared the effectiveness of Dating Matters with standard of care across middle school. Standard of care was an evidence-based teen dating violence prevention curriculum (Safe Dates) implemented in eighth grade.Setting/participantsForty-six middle schools in high-risk urban neighborhoods in four U.S. cities were randomized. Schools lost to follow-up were replaced with new schools, which were independently randomized (71{\%} school retention). Students were surveyed in fall and spring of sixth, seventh, and eighth grades (2012–2016). The analysis sample includes students from schools implementing Dating Matters or standard of care for >2 years who started sixth grade in the fall of 2012 or 2013 and had dated (N=2,349 students, mean age 12 years, 49{\%} female, and 55{\%} black, non-Hispanic, 28{\%} Hispanic, 17{\%} other).InterventionDating Matters is a comprehensive, multicomponent prevention model including classroom-delivered programs for sixth to eighth graders, training for parents of sixth to eighth graders, educator training, a youth communications program, and local health department activities to assess capacity and track teen dating violence–related policy and data.Main outcome measuresSelf-reported teen dating violence perpetration and victimization, use of negative conflict resolution strategies, and positive relationship skills were examined as outcomes. Imputation and analyses were conducted in 2017.ResultsLatent panel models demonstrated significant program effects for three of four outcomes; Dating Matters students reported 8.43{\%} lower teen dating violence perpetration, 9.78{\%} lower teen dating violence victimization, and 5.52{\%} lower use of negative conflict resolution strategies, on average across time points and cohorts, than standard of care students. There were no significant effects on positive relationship behaviors.ConclusionsDating Matters demonstrates comparative effectiveness, through middle school, for reducing unhealthy relationship behaviors, such as teen dating violence and use of negative conflict resolution strategies, relative to the standard of care intervention.",
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Niolon, PH, Vivolo-kantor, AM, Tracy, AJ, Latzman, NE, Little, TD, Degue, S, Lang, KM, Estefan, LF, Ghazarian, SR, Mcintosh, WLK, Taylor, B, Johnson, LL, Kuoh, H, Burton, T, Fortson, B, Mumford, EA, Nelson, SC, Joseph, H, Valle, LA & Tharp, AT 2019, 'An RCT of dating matters: Effects on teen dating violence and relationship behaviors', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 13-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2019.02.022

An RCT of dating matters : Effects on teen dating violence and relationship behaviors. / Niolon, Phyllis Holditch; Vivolo-kantor, Alana M.; Tracy, Allison J.; Latzman, Natasha E.; Little, Todd D.; Degue, Sarah; Lang, Kyle M.; Estefan, Lianne Fuino; Ghazarian, Sharon R.; Mcintosh, Wendy Li Kamwa; Taylor, Bruce; Johnson, Linda L.; Kuoh, Henrietta; Burton, Tessa; Fortson, Beverly; Mumford, Elizabeth A.; Nelson, Shannon C.; Joseph, Hannah; Valle, Linda Anne; Tharp, Andra Teten.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 57, No. 1, 2019, p. 13-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - An RCT of dating matters

T2 - Effects on teen dating violence and relationship behaviors

AU - Niolon, Phyllis Holditch

AU - Vivolo-kantor, Alana M.

AU - Tracy, Allison J.

AU - Latzman, Natasha E.

AU - Little, Todd D.

AU - Degue, Sarah

AU - Lang, Kyle M.

AU - Estefan, Lianne Fuino

AU - Ghazarian, Sharon R.

AU - Mcintosh, Wendy Li Kamwa

AU - Taylor, Bruce

AU - Johnson, Linda L.

AU - Kuoh, Henrietta

AU - Burton, Tessa

AU - Fortson, Beverly

AU - Mumford, Elizabeth A.

AU - Nelson, Shannon C.

AU - Joseph, Hannah

AU - Valle, Linda Anne

AU - Tharp, Andra Teten

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - IntroductionTeen dating violence is a serious public health problem with few effective prevention strategies. This study examines whether the Dating Matters comprehensive prevention model, compared with a standard of care intervention, prevented negative relationship behaviors and promoted positive relationship behaviors.Study designThis longitudinal, cluster-RCT compared the effectiveness of Dating Matters with standard of care across middle school. Standard of care was an evidence-based teen dating violence prevention curriculum (Safe Dates) implemented in eighth grade.Setting/participantsForty-six middle schools in high-risk urban neighborhoods in four U.S. cities were randomized. Schools lost to follow-up were replaced with new schools, which were independently randomized (71% school retention). Students were surveyed in fall and spring of sixth, seventh, and eighth grades (2012–2016). The analysis sample includes students from schools implementing Dating Matters or standard of care for >2 years who started sixth grade in the fall of 2012 or 2013 and had dated (N=2,349 students, mean age 12 years, 49% female, and 55% black, non-Hispanic, 28% Hispanic, 17% other).InterventionDating Matters is a comprehensive, multicomponent prevention model including classroom-delivered programs for sixth to eighth graders, training for parents of sixth to eighth graders, educator training, a youth communications program, and local health department activities to assess capacity and track teen dating violence–related policy and data.Main outcome measuresSelf-reported teen dating violence perpetration and victimization, use of negative conflict resolution strategies, and positive relationship skills were examined as outcomes. Imputation and analyses were conducted in 2017.ResultsLatent panel models demonstrated significant program effects for three of four outcomes; Dating Matters students reported 8.43% lower teen dating violence perpetration, 9.78% lower teen dating violence victimization, and 5.52% lower use of negative conflict resolution strategies, on average across time points and cohorts, than standard of care students. There were no significant effects on positive relationship behaviors.ConclusionsDating Matters demonstrates comparative effectiveness, through middle school, for reducing unhealthy relationship behaviors, such as teen dating violence and use of negative conflict resolution strategies, relative to the standard of care intervention.

AB - IntroductionTeen dating violence is a serious public health problem with few effective prevention strategies. This study examines whether the Dating Matters comprehensive prevention model, compared with a standard of care intervention, prevented negative relationship behaviors and promoted positive relationship behaviors.Study designThis longitudinal, cluster-RCT compared the effectiveness of Dating Matters with standard of care across middle school. Standard of care was an evidence-based teen dating violence prevention curriculum (Safe Dates) implemented in eighth grade.Setting/participantsForty-six middle schools in high-risk urban neighborhoods in four U.S. cities were randomized. Schools lost to follow-up were replaced with new schools, which were independently randomized (71% school retention). Students were surveyed in fall and spring of sixth, seventh, and eighth grades (2012–2016). The analysis sample includes students from schools implementing Dating Matters or standard of care for >2 years who started sixth grade in the fall of 2012 or 2013 and had dated (N=2,349 students, mean age 12 years, 49% female, and 55% black, non-Hispanic, 28% Hispanic, 17% other).InterventionDating Matters is a comprehensive, multicomponent prevention model including classroom-delivered programs for sixth to eighth graders, training for parents of sixth to eighth graders, educator training, a youth communications program, and local health department activities to assess capacity and track teen dating violence–related policy and data.Main outcome measuresSelf-reported teen dating violence perpetration and victimization, use of negative conflict resolution strategies, and positive relationship skills were examined as outcomes. Imputation and analyses were conducted in 2017.ResultsLatent panel models demonstrated significant program effects for three of four outcomes; Dating Matters students reported 8.43% lower teen dating violence perpetration, 9.78% lower teen dating violence victimization, and 5.52% lower use of negative conflict resolution strategies, on average across time points and cohorts, than standard of care students. There were no significant effects on positive relationship behaviors.ConclusionsDating Matters demonstrates comparative effectiveness, through middle school, for reducing unhealthy relationship behaviors, such as teen dating violence and use of negative conflict resolution strategies, relative to the standard of care intervention.

KW - COMMUNITY VIOLENCE

KW - CONFLICT

KW - EXPOSURE

KW - PREVENTION PROGRAM

KW - SAFE DATES

KW - VICTIMIZATION

KW - YOUTH

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.02.022

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2019.02.022

M3 - Article

VL - 57

SP - 13

EP - 23

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 1

ER -