Anatomy of a decision trap in complex new product development projects

K.E. van Oorschot, H.A. Akkermans, K. Sengupta, L.N. van Wassenhove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We conducted a longitudinal process study of one firm's failed attempt to develop a new product. Our extensive data analysis suggests that teams in complex dynamic environments characterized by delays are subject to multiple “information filters” that blur their perception of actual project performance. Consequently, teams do not realize their projects are in trouble and repeatedly fall into a “decision trap” in which they stretch current project stages at the expense of future stages. This slowly and gradually reduces the likelihood of project success. However, because of the information filters, teams fail to notice what is happening until it is too late.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-307
JournalAcademy of Management Journal
Volume56
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Product development
Development projects
Trap
New product development
Filter
Project performance
Stretch
Dynamic environment
Expenses
Project success
Complex dynamics
New products

Cite this

van Oorschot, K. E., Akkermans, H. A., Sengupta, K., & van Wassenhove, L. N. (2013). Anatomy of a decision trap in complex new product development projects. Academy of Management Journal, 56(1), 285-307.
van Oorschot, K.E. ; Akkermans, H.A. ; Sengupta, K. ; van Wassenhove, L.N. / Anatomy of a decision trap in complex new product development projects. In: Academy of Management Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 56, No. 1. pp. 285-307.
@article{75ccab7f767943afb89ad60b137c65ce,
title = "Anatomy of a decision trap in complex new product development projects",
abstract = "We conducted a longitudinal process study of one firm's failed attempt to develop a new product. Our extensive data analysis suggests that teams in complex dynamic environments characterized by delays are subject to multiple “information filters” that blur their perception of actual project performance. Consequently, teams do not realize their projects are in trouble and repeatedly fall into a “decision trap” in which they stretch current project stages at the expense of future stages. This slowly and gradually reduces the likelihood of project success. However, because of the information filters, teams fail to notice what is happening until it is too late.",
author = "{van Oorschot}, K.E. and H.A. Akkermans and K. Sengupta and {van Wassenhove}, L.N.",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "285--307",
journal = "Academy of Management Journal",
issn = "0001-4273",
publisher = "Academy of Management",
number = "1",

}

van Oorschot, KE, Akkermans, HA, Sengupta, K & van Wassenhove, LN 2013, 'Anatomy of a decision trap in complex new product development projects', Academy of Management Journal, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 285-307.

Anatomy of a decision trap in complex new product development projects. / van Oorschot, K.E.; Akkermans, H.A.; Sengupta, K.; van Wassenhove, L.N.

In: Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 56, No. 1, 2013, p. 285-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anatomy of a decision trap in complex new product development projects

AU - van Oorschot, K.E.

AU - Akkermans, H.A.

AU - Sengupta, K.

AU - van Wassenhove, L.N.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - We conducted a longitudinal process study of one firm's failed attempt to develop a new product. Our extensive data analysis suggests that teams in complex dynamic environments characterized by delays are subject to multiple “information filters” that blur their perception of actual project performance. Consequently, teams do not realize their projects are in trouble and repeatedly fall into a “decision trap” in which they stretch current project stages at the expense of future stages. This slowly and gradually reduces the likelihood of project success. However, because of the information filters, teams fail to notice what is happening until it is too late.

AB - We conducted a longitudinal process study of one firm's failed attempt to develop a new product. Our extensive data analysis suggests that teams in complex dynamic environments characterized by delays are subject to multiple “information filters” that blur their perception of actual project performance. Consequently, teams do not realize their projects are in trouble and repeatedly fall into a “decision trap” in which they stretch current project stages at the expense of future stages. This slowly and gradually reduces the likelihood of project success. However, because of the information filters, teams fail to notice what is happening until it is too late.

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 285

EP - 307

JO - Academy of Management Journal

JF - Academy of Management Journal

SN - 0001-4273

IS - 1

ER -