Anxiety and hemodynamic reactivity during cardiac stress testing: The role of gender and age in myocardial ischemia

M. Bekendam, P.M.C. Mommersteeg*, W.J. Kop, J.W. Widdershoven, I.A.C. Vermeltfoort

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
The prevalence of myocardial ischemia is associated with anxiety. State and trait anxiety are more common in younger women compared to men, and high anxiety levels could affect hemodynamic reactivity during cardiac stress testing. The aim is to examine whether anxiety plays a role in gender differences in patients ≤ 65 and > 65 years in hemodynamic reactivity and ischemia during cardiac stress testing.
Methods and results
Included were 291 patients (66.8 ± 8.7 years, 45% women) with suspect ischemia undergoing myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPI-SPECT). Primary outcomes were semi-quantitative summed difference score (SDS) and summed stress score (SSS), as continuous indicators of myocardial ischemia. Analyses were stratified by age. Trait anxiety was measured using a validated questionnaire (GAD-7) and state anxiety using facial expression analyses software. Overall, trait and state anxiety were not associated with the prevalence of ischemia (N = 107, 36%). A significant interaction was found between gender and trait anxiety in women ≤ 65 years for SDS (F(1,4) = 5.73, P = .019) and SSS (F(1,10) = 6.50, P = .012). This was not found for state anxiety.
Conclusion
SDS and SSS were significantly higher in women younger than 65 years with high trait anxiety. This interaction was not found in men and women over 65 years.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Nuclear Cardiology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2020

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Keywords

  • ADENOSINE
  • ASSOCIATION
  • Age
  • CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE
  • Cardiac stress testing
  • DEPRESSION
  • FACIAL EXPRESSIONS
  • INFARCTION
  • Myocardial ischemia
  • RATES
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • SEX-DIFFERENCES
  • Sex differences
  • Trait anxiety
  • WOMEN

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