Applicant perceptions of initial lob candidate screening with asynchronous job interviews: Does personality matter?

A.M.F. Hiemstra*, Janneke Oostrom, E. Derous, A.W. Serlie, M.P. Born

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)
43 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Applicant fairness perceptions of asynchronous job interviews were assessed among panelists (Study 1, N = 160) and highly educated actual applicants (Study 2, N = 103). Furthermore, we also examined whether personality explained applicants' perceptions. Participants, particularly actual applicants, had negative perceptions of the fairness and procedural justice of asynchronous job interviews. Extraverted applicants perceived more opportunity to perform with the asynchronous job interview than introverts. A trait interaction between Neuroticism and Extraversion was tested, but no significant results were found. Although the first selection stage is increasingly digitized, this study shows that applicant perceptions of asynchronous job interviews are relatively negative. The influence of personality on these perceptions appears to be limited.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138-147
JournalJournal of Personnel Psychology
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

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