Are actual and perceived intellectual self-enhancers evaluated differently by social perceivers?

M. Dufner, J.J.A. Denissen, C. Sedikides, M.H.W. van Zalk, W.H.J. Meeus, M.A.G. van Aken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Do actual and perceived self-enhancement entail differing social impressions (i.e. interpersonal evaluations)? Actual self-enhancement represents unduly positive self-views, as gauged by an objective criterion (in this case, IQ scores), whereas perceived self-enhancement involves the extent to which an individual is seen by informants (i.e. peers or observers) as self-enhancing. In an online survey (N = 337), a laboratory experiment (N = 75), and a round-robin study (N = 183), we tested the effects of actual and perceived intellectual self-enhancement on (informant-rated) emotional stability, social attractiveness, and social influence. Actual self-enhancers were rated as emotionally stable, socially attractive, and socially influential. High perceived self-enhancers were judged as socially influential, whereas low-to-moderate perceived self-enhancers were deemed emotionally stable and socially attractive. Privately entertained, illusory positive (even extreme) self-beliefs confer social benefits, whereas being perceived as self-enhancing buys social influence at the cost of being despised.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)621-633
JournalEuropean Journal of Personality
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Dufner, M. ; Denissen, J.J.A. ; Sedikides, C. ; van Zalk, M.H.W. ; Meeus, W.H.J. ; van Aken, M.A.G. / Are actual and perceived intellectual self-enhancers evaluated differently by social perceivers?. In: European Journal of Personality. 2013 ; Vol. 27, No. 6. pp. 621-633.
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title = "Are actual and perceived intellectual self-enhancers evaluated differently by social perceivers?",
abstract = "Do actual and perceived self-enhancement entail differing social impressions (i.e. interpersonal evaluations)? Actual self-enhancement represents unduly positive self-views, as gauged by an objective criterion (in this case, IQ scores), whereas perceived self-enhancement involves the extent to which an individual is seen by informants (i.e. peers or observers) as self-enhancing. In an online survey (N = 337), a laboratory experiment (N = 75), and a round-robin study (N = 183), we tested the effects of actual and perceived intellectual self-enhancement on (informant-rated) emotional stability, social attractiveness, and social influence. Actual self-enhancers were rated as emotionally stable, socially attractive, and socially influential. High perceived self-enhancers were judged as socially influential, whereas low-to-moderate perceived self-enhancers were deemed emotionally stable and socially attractive. Privately entertained, illusory positive (even extreme) self-beliefs confer social benefits, whereas being perceived as self-enhancing buys social influence at the cost of being despised.",
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Are actual and perceived intellectual self-enhancers evaluated differently by social perceivers? / Dufner, M.; Denissen, J.J.A.; Sedikides, C.; van Zalk, M.H.W.; Meeus, W.H.J.; van Aken, M.A.G.

In: European Journal of Personality, Vol. 27, No. 6, 2013, p. 621-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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