Are changes in the digital divide consistent with global equality or inequality?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

To answer the question in the title, the author divides a sample of developing countries according to whether they have experienced a rise or fall of the (absolute) digital divide in the Internet. He suggests that in countries where the divide is falling, incomes will tend to be relatively high, and vice versa in the case of a rising divide. This relationship is examined on the basis of simple regression analysis; the analysis indicates the hypothesis is true with a high level of significance. Interpretation of the findings is carried out mainly in relation to countries from Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. In short, recent changes in the digital divide are associated with global inequality rather than equality, although there are some important anomalies that need to be explained.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-128
JournalThe Information Society
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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digital divide
Developing countries
Regression analysis
equality
Internet
Latin America
regression analysis
developing country
income
interpretation
Equality
Digital divide
Sub-Saharan Africa
World Wide Web
Income
Anomaly
Latin America and the Caribbean

Cite this

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Are changes in the digital divide consistent with global equality or inequality? / James, M.J.

In: The Information Society, Vol. 27, No. 2, 2011, p. 121-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AB - To answer the question in the title, the author divides a sample of developing countries according to whether they have experienced a rise or fall of the (absolute) digital divide in the Internet. He suggests that in countries where the divide is falling, incomes will tend to be relatively high, and vice versa in the case of a rising divide. This relationship is examined on the basis of simple regression analysis; the analysis indicates the hypothesis is true with a high level of significance. Interpretation of the findings is carried out mainly in relation to countries from Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. In short, recent changes in the digital divide are associated with global inequality rather than equality, although there are some important anomalies that need to be explained.

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