Are conservatives happier than liberals?

Not always and not everywhere

O. Stavrova, Maike Luhmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Prior research has shown that conservatives report higher levels of subjective well-being than liberals (happiness gap). We investigate to what extent this phenomenon exists in different time periods within the United States (Study 1, N = 40,000) and in different countries (Study 2, N = 230,000). Consistent with our hypotheses grounded in the "shared reality" and person-culture fit literature, conservatives were happier and more satisfied with their lives than liberals to the extent that the conservative political ideology prevailed in their socio-cultural context, be it a specific time period in the U.S. or a specific country. These results show that the happiness gap between conservatives and liberals is less universal than previously assumed. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-35
JournalJournal of Research in Personality
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2016

Keywords

  • Political ideology
  • Subjective well-being
  • Life satisfaction
  • Happiness
  • Person-culture fit
  • POLITICAL-IDEOLOGY
  • PEOPLE HAPPY
  • SELF-ESTEEM
  • RELIGIOSITY
  • HAPPINESS
  • ATTITUDES
  • CONTEXT
  • FIT

Cite this

@article{b9f05b506dcd444588e2eb1ba7200e02,
title = "Are conservatives happier than liberals?: Not always and not everywhere",
abstract = "Prior research has shown that conservatives report higher levels of subjective well-being than liberals (happiness gap). We investigate to what extent this phenomenon exists in different time periods within the United States (Study 1, N = 40,000) and in different countries (Study 2, N = 230,000). Consistent with our hypotheses grounded in the {"}shared reality{"} and person-culture fit literature, conservatives were happier and more satisfied with their lives than liberals to the extent that the conservative political ideology prevailed in their socio-cultural context, be it a specific time period in the U.S. or a specific country. These results show that the happiness gap between conservatives and liberals is less universal than previously assumed. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Political ideology, Subjective well-being, Life satisfaction, Happiness, Person-culture fit, POLITICAL-IDEOLOGY, PEOPLE HAPPY, SELF-ESTEEM, RELIGIOSITY, HAPPINESS, ATTITUDES, CONTEXT, FIT",
author = "O. Stavrova and Maike Luhmann",
year = "2016",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.jrp.2016.04.011",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "29--35",
journal = "Journal of Research in Personality",
issn = "0092-6566",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE",

}

Are conservatives happier than liberals? Not always and not everywhere. / Stavrova, O.; Luhmann, Maike.

In: Journal of Research in Personality, Vol. 63, 08.2016, p. 29-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are conservatives happier than liberals?

T2 - Not always and not everywhere

AU - Stavrova, O.

AU - Luhmann, Maike

PY - 2016/8

Y1 - 2016/8

N2 - Prior research has shown that conservatives report higher levels of subjective well-being than liberals (happiness gap). We investigate to what extent this phenomenon exists in different time periods within the United States (Study 1, N = 40,000) and in different countries (Study 2, N = 230,000). Consistent with our hypotheses grounded in the "shared reality" and person-culture fit literature, conservatives were happier and more satisfied with their lives than liberals to the extent that the conservative political ideology prevailed in their socio-cultural context, be it a specific time period in the U.S. or a specific country. These results show that the happiness gap between conservatives and liberals is less universal than previously assumed. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - Prior research has shown that conservatives report higher levels of subjective well-being than liberals (happiness gap). We investigate to what extent this phenomenon exists in different time periods within the United States (Study 1, N = 40,000) and in different countries (Study 2, N = 230,000). Consistent with our hypotheses grounded in the "shared reality" and person-culture fit literature, conservatives were happier and more satisfied with their lives than liberals to the extent that the conservative political ideology prevailed in their socio-cultural context, be it a specific time period in the U.S. or a specific country. These results show that the happiness gap between conservatives and liberals is less universal than previously assumed. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - Political ideology

KW - Subjective well-being

KW - Life satisfaction

KW - Happiness

KW - Person-culture fit

KW - POLITICAL-IDEOLOGY

KW - PEOPLE HAPPY

KW - SELF-ESTEEM

KW - RELIGIOSITY

KW - HAPPINESS

KW - ATTITUDES

KW - CONTEXT

KW - FIT

U2 - 10.1016/j.jrp.2016.04.011

DO - 10.1016/j.jrp.2016.04.011

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 29

EP - 35

JO - Journal of Research in Personality

JF - Journal of Research in Personality

SN - 0092-6566

ER -