Are education and nationalism a happy marriage? Ethno-nationalist disruptions of education in Dutch classrooms

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    Following Gellner, citizenship education has often been framed in terms of nationalism. This framing is supported by methodological nationalism that legitimizes nationalism as either functional (civic nationalism) or natural (ethnic nationalism). Based on a triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data, this study of the dynamics in the classes of a Dutch faculty of social professions highlights the disruptive impact of nationalism on citizenship education, spilling over to other courses as well. Ethno-nationalist discourses in Dutch media and politics as well as in multiculturalism approaches used in citizenship education fuel conflicts between non-migrant students and students with a migration background that disrupt education. It is argued that in globalized settings like these classes, a more viable approach to citizenship education would take an institutional instead of communitarian perspective.
    LanguageEnglish
    JournalBritish Journal of Sociology of Education
    StateAccepted/In press - 16 May 2018

    Fingerprint

    nationalism
    marriage
    classroom
    citizenship
    education
    migration background
    triangulation
    multicultural society
    student
    profession
    politics
    discourse

    Keywords

    • Citizenship
    • civic nationalism
    • education
    • ethnic conflicts
    • ethnic nationalism
    • the Netherlands

    Cite this

    @article{ec0de57969df4cd896874186e6602076,
    title = "Are education and nationalism a happy marriage? Ethno-nationalist disruptions of education in Dutch classrooms",
    abstract = "Following Gellner, citizenship education has often been framed in terms of nationalism. This framing is supported by methodological nationalism that legitimizes nationalism as either functional (civic nationalism) or natural (ethnic nationalism). Based on a triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data, this study of the dynamics in the classes of a Dutch faculty of social professions highlights the disruptive impact of nationalism on citizenship education, spilling over to other courses as well. Ethno-nationalist discourses in Dutch media and politics as well as in multiculturalism approaches used in citizenship education fuel conflicts between non-migrant students and students with a migration background that disrupt education. It is argued that in globalized settings like these classes, a more viable approach to citizenship education would take an institutional instead of communitarian perspective.",
    keywords = "Citizenship, civic nationalism, education, ethnic conflicts, ethnic nationalism, the Netherlands",
    author = "Hans Siebers",
    year = "2018",
    month = "5",
    day = "16",
    language = "English",
    journal = "British Journal of Sociology of Education",
    issn = "0142-5692",
    publisher = "Taylor & Francis",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Are education and nationalism a happy marriage? Ethno-nationalist disruptions of education in Dutch classrooms

    AU - Siebers,Hans

    PY - 2018/5/16

    Y1 - 2018/5/16

    N2 - Following Gellner, citizenship education has often been framed in terms of nationalism. This framing is supported by methodological nationalism that legitimizes nationalism as either functional (civic nationalism) or natural (ethnic nationalism). Based on a triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data, this study of the dynamics in the classes of a Dutch faculty of social professions highlights the disruptive impact of nationalism on citizenship education, spilling over to other courses as well. Ethno-nationalist discourses in Dutch media and politics as well as in multiculturalism approaches used in citizenship education fuel conflicts between non-migrant students and students with a migration background that disrupt education. It is argued that in globalized settings like these classes, a more viable approach to citizenship education would take an institutional instead of communitarian perspective.

    AB - Following Gellner, citizenship education has often been framed in terms of nationalism. This framing is supported by methodological nationalism that legitimizes nationalism as either functional (civic nationalism) or natural (ethnic nationalism). Based on a triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data, this study of the dynamics in the classes of a Dutch faculty of social professions highlights the disruptive impact of nationalism on citizenship education, spilling over to other courses as well. Ethno-nationalist discourses in Dutch media and politics as well as in multiculturalism approaches used in citizenship education fuel conflicts between non-migrant students and students with a migration background that disrupt education. It is argued that in globalized settings like these classes, a more viable approach to citizenship education would take an institutional instead of communitarian perspective.

    KW - Citizenship

    KW - civic nationalism

    KW - education

    KW - ethnic conflicts

    KW - ethnic nationalism

    KW - the Netherlands

    M3 - Article

    JO - British Journal of Sociology of Education

    T2 - British Journal of Sociology of Education

    JF - British Journal of Sociology of Education

    SN - 0142-5692

    ER -