Are Short-Lived Jobs Stepping Stones to Long-Lasting Jobs?

B. Cockx, M. Picchio

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Abstract

This paper assesses whether short-lived jobs (lasting one quarter or less and involuntarily ending in unemployment) are stepping stones to long-lasting jobs (enduring one year or more) for Belgian long-term unemployed school-leavers. We proceed in two steps. First, we estimate labour market trajectories in a multi-spell duration model that incorporates lagged duration and lagged occurrence dependence. Second, in a simulation we find that (fe)male school-leavers accepting a short-lived job are, within two years, 13.4 (9.5) percentage points more likely to find a long-lasting job than in the counterfactual in which they reject short-lived jobs.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationTilburg
PublisherMicroeconomics
Number of pages36
Volume2010-95
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Publication series

NameCentER Discussion Paper
Volume2010-95

Keywords

  • event history model
  • transition data
  • state dependence
  • short-lived jobs
  • stepping stone effect
  • long-lasting jobs

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    Cockx, B., & Picchio, M. (2010). Are Short-Lived Jobs Stepping Stones to Long-Lasting Jobs? (CentER Discussion Paper; Vol. 2010-95). Microeconomics.