Are short-lived jobs stepping stones to long-lasting jobs?

B. Cockx, M. Picchio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This article assesses whether short-lived jobs (lasting one quarter or less and involuntarily ending in unemployment) are stepping stones to long-lasting jobs (enduring 1 year or more) for Belgian long-term unemployed school-leavers. We proceed in two steps. First, we estimate labour market trajectories in a multi-spell duration model that incorporates lagged duration and lagged occurrence dependence. Second, in a simulation we find that (fe)male school-leavers accepting a short-lived job are, within 2 years, 13.4 (9.5) percentage points more likely to find a long-lasting job than in the counterfactual in which they reject short-lived jobs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)646-675
JournalOxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics
Volume74
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Duration Models
Percentage Points
Unemployment
Likely
Trajectory
Estimate
Simulation
Belgian
school
unemployment
labor market
Market
simulation

Cite this

Cockx, B. ; Picchio, M. / Are short-lived jobs stepping stones to long-lasting jobs?. In: Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics. 2012 ; Vol. 74, No. 5. pp. 646-675.
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abstract = "This article assesses whether short-lived jobs (lasting one quarter or less and involuntarily ending in unemployment) are stepping stones to long-lasting jobs (enduring 1 year or more) for Belgian long-term unemployed school-leavers. We proceed in two steps. First, we estimate labour market trajectories in a multi-spell duration model that incorporates lagged duration and lagged occurrence dependence. Second, in a simulation we find that (fe)male school-leavers accepting a short-lived job are, within 2 years, 13.4 (9.5) percentage points more likely to find a long-lasting job than in the counterfactual in which they reject short-lived jobs.",
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Are short-lived jobs stepping stones to long-lasting jobs? / Cockx, B.; Picchio, M.

In: Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Vol. 74, No. 5, 2012, p. 646-675.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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