Association of Type D personality with cognitive functioning in individuals with and without cardiovascular disease: The Gutenberg health study

J. Unterrainer, M. Michal, B. Rham, J. Hadzibegovic, P.S. Wild, A. Schulz, T. Münzel, M. Blettner, K. Lackner, N. Pfeiffer, S. Blankenberg, J. Denollet, M.E. Beutel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Objective
Distressed (‘Type D’) personality is associated with adverse health outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). While personality traits from the Five-Factor Model are related to cognitive functioning, neither Type D personality nor its underlying traits negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI) have been investigated regarding cognition. We therefore compared the predictive value of Type D classification and its subcomponents NA and SI on planning performance in individuals with and without CVD.
Methods
Type D personality traits (DS14) were determined in a population-based sample of 4026 participants (including 549 with CVD) aged 40–80 years from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) and related to planning performance as assessed with the Tower of London task. Current depression and anxiety were controlled as state variables.
Results
Type D personality status was negatively associated with planning performance in the CVD patient group only (p < 0.001) but had no impact in the non-CVD group (p = 0.40). In the overall sample, NA was negatively and SI positively associated with planning performance. No differential effect on planning between groups was found for depression and anxiety.
Conclusion
While the subcomponents NA and SI in the population-based sample confirm and extend previous research on personality traits and cognition, Type D personality classification in combination with CVD emerged as a risk factor for decreased cognitive functioning, independent of depression and anxiety. These findings implicate the need to early focus on individual differences in cognitive functioning in patients with CVD.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256–261
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume214
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Depression
Individuality

Cite this

Unterrainer, J. ; Michal, M. ; Rham, B. ; Hadzibegovic, J. ; Wild, P.S. ; Schulz, A. ; Münzel, T. ; Blettner, M. ; Lackner, K. ; Pfeiffer, N. ; Blankenberg, S. ; Denollet, J. ; Beutel, M.E. / Association of Type D personality with cognitive functioning in individuals with and without cardiovascular disease : The Gutenberg health study. In: International Journal of Cardiology. 2016 ; Vol. 214. pp. 256–261.
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title = "Association of Type D personality with cognitive functioning in individuals with and without cardiovascular disease: The Gutenberg health study",
abstract = "ObjectiveDistressed (‘Type D’) personality is associated with adverse health outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). While personality traits from the Five-Factor Model are related to cognitive functioning, neither Type D personality nor its underlying traits negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI) have been investigated regarding cognition. We therefore compared the predictive value of Type D classification and its subcomponents NA and SI on planning performance in individuals with and without CVD.MethodsType D personality traits (DS14) were determined in a population-based sample of 4026 participants (including 549 with CVD) aged 40–80 years from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) and related to planning performance as assessed with the Tower of London task. Current depression and anxiety were controlled as state variables.ResultsType D personality status was negatively associated with planning performance in the CVD patient group only (p < 0.001) but had no impact in the non-CVD group (p = 0.40). In the overall sample, NA was negatively and SI positively associated with planning performance. No differential effect on planning between groups was found for depression and anxiety.ConclusionWhile the subcomponents NA and SI in the population-based sample confirm and extend previous research on personality traits and cognition, Type D personality classification in combination with CVD emerged as a risk factor for decreased cognitive functioning, independent of depression and anxiety. These findings implicate the need to early focus on individual differences in cognitive functioning in patients with CVD.",
author = "J. Unterrainer and M. Michal and B. Rham and J. Hadzibegovic and P.S. Wild and A. Schulz and T. M{\"u}nzel and M. Blettner and K. Lackner and N. Pfeiffer and S. Blankenberg and J. Denollet and M.E. Beutel",
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language = "English",
volume = "214",
pages = "256–261",
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Unterrainer, J, Michal, M, Rham, B, Hadzibegovic, J, Wild, PS, Schulz, A, Münzel, T, Blettner, M, Lackner, K, Pfeiffer, N, Blankenberg, S, Denollet, J & Beutel, ME 2016, 'Association of Type D personality with cognitive functioning in individuals with and without cardiovascular disease: The Gutenberg health study' International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 214, pp. 256–261. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.03.221

Association of Type D personality with cognitive functioning in individuals with and without cardiovascular disease : The Gutenberg health study. / Unterrainer, J.; Michal, M.; Rham, B.; Hadzibegovic, J.; Wild, P.S.; Schulz, A.; Münzel, T.; Blettner, M.; Lackner, K.; Pfeiffer, N.; Blankenberg, S.; Denollet, J.; Beutel, M.E.

In: International Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 214, 2016, p. 256–261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of Type D personality with cognitive functioning in individuals with and without cardiovascular disease

T2 - The Gutenberg health study

AU - Unterrainer, J.

AU - Michal, M.

AU - Rham, B.

AU - Hadzibegovic, J.

AU - Wild, P.S.

AU - Schulz, A.

AU - Münzel, T.

AU - Blettner, M.

AU - Lackner, K.

AU - Pfeiffer, N.

AU - Blankenberg, S.

AU - Denollet, J.

AU - Beutel, M.E.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - ObjectiveDistressed (‘Type D’) personality is associated with adverse health outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). While personality traits from the Five-Factor Model are related to cognitive functioning, neither Type D personality nor its underlying traits negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI) have been investigated regarding cognition. We therefore compared the predictive value of Type D classification and its subcomponents NA and SI on planning performance in individuals with and without CVD.MethodsType D personality traits (DS14) were determined in a population-based sample of 4026 participants (including 549 with CVD) aged 40–80 years from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) and related to planning performance as assessed with the Tower of London task. Current depression and anxiety were controlled as state variables.ResultsType D personality status was negatively associated with planning performance in the CVD patient group only (p < 0.001) but had no impact in the non-CVD group (p = 0.40). In the overall sample, NA was negatively and SI positively associated with planning performance. No differential effect on planning between groups was found for depression and anxiety.ConclusionWhile the subcomponents NA and SI in the population-based sample confirm and extend previous research on personality traits and cognition, Type D personality classification in combination with CVD emerged as a risk factor for decreased cognitive functioning, independent of depression and anxiety. These findings implicate the need to early focus on individual differences in cognitive functioning in patients with CVD.

AB - ObjectiveDistressed (‘Type D’) personality is associated with adverse health outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). While personality traits from the Five-Factor Model are related to cognitive functioning, neither Type D personality nor its underlying traits negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI) have been investigated regarding cognition. We therefore compared the predictive value of Type D classification and its subcomponents NA and SI on planning performance in individuals with and without CVD.MethodsType D personality traits (DS14) were determined in a population-based sample of 4026 participants (including 549 with CVD) aged 40–80 years from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) and related to planning performance as assessed with the Tower of London task. Current depression and anxiety were controlled as state variables.ResultsType D personality status was negatively associated with planning performance in the CVD patient group only (p < 0.001) but had no impact in the non-CVD group (p = 0.40). In the overall sample, NA was negatively and SI positively associated with planning performance. No differential effect on planning between groups was found for depression and anxiety.ConclusionWhile the subcomponents NA and SI in the population-based sample confirm and extend previous research on personality traits and cognition, Type D personality classification in combination with CVD emerged as a risk factor for decreased cognitive functioning, independent of depression and anxiety. These findings implicate the need to early focus on individual differences in cognitive functioning in patients with CVD.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.03.221

DO - 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.03.221

M3 - Article

VL - 214

SP - 256

EP - 261

JO - International Journal of Cardiology

JF - International Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0167-5273

ER -