Associations between technical quality of diabetes care and patient experience

O.A. Arah, B. Roset, D. Delnoij, N.S. Klazinga, K. Stronks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Aims 
It has long been held that high-quality care has both technical and interpersonal aspects. The nature and strength of any association between both aspects remain poorly explored. This study investigated the associations between diabetes patients’ reports of receiving recommended care (as measures of technical quality) and their experience and ratings (as measures of interpersonal care).
Methods 
Using data from a cross section of 3096 patients with diabetes nested within 24 diabetes-care-networks, we conducted multilevel regression analysis of the relationships between nine indicators of receiving care recommended in practice guidelines and: six scales of patient experience and global ratings of general practitioner, nurses, and overall diabetes care.
Results 
On average, reporting having received recommended care was associated with reporting better patient experience and ratings. The extent and frequencies of these associations varied across the different care processes. Receiving foot examination, physical activity advice, smoking status check, eye examination, and HbA1c testing, but not nutritional advice, urine, cholesterol or blood pressure checks, were statistically associated with better patient experience and global ratings. Those who received HbA1c testing rated their overall care 1.002 points higher (95% confidence interval: 0.726–1.278) on a scale of 0–10 than those who did not.
Conclusions 
Higher self-reported technical quality of care in diabetes appears to be frequently but not always associated with better experiences and ratings. It is possible that the former leads to the latter and/or that both share a common cause within providers. Both care aspects do not seem interchangeable during performance assessment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-145
JournalHealth Expectations
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Practice Guidelines
General Practitioners
Nurses
Urine
Confidence Intervals
Exercise

Cite this

Arah, O.A. ; Roset, B. ; Delnoij, D. ; Klazinga, N.S. ; Stronks, K. / Associations between technical quality of diabetes care and patient experience. In: Health Expectations. 2013 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 136-145.
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title = "Associations between technical quality of diabetes care and patient experience",
abstract = "Aims  It has long been held that high-quality care has both technical and interpersonal aspects. The nature and strength of any association between both aspects remain poorly explored. This study investigated the associations between diabetes patients’ reports of receiving recommended care (as measures of technical quality) and their experience and ratings (as measures of interpersonal care).Methods  Using data from a cross section of 3096 patients with diabetes nested within 24 diabetes-care-networks, we conducted multilevel regression analysis of the relationships between nine indicators of receiving care recommended in practice guidelines and: six scales of patient experience and global ratings of general practitioner, nurses, and overall diabetes care.Results  On average, reporting having received recommended care was associated with reporting better patient experience and ratings. The extent and frequencies of these associations varied across the different care processes. Receiving foot examination, physical activity advice, smoking status check, eye examination, and HbA1c testing, but not nutritional advice, urine, cholesterol or blood pressure checks, were statistically associated with better patient experience and global ratings. Those who received HbA1c testing rated their overall care 1.002 points higher (95{\%} confidence interval: 0.726–1.278) on a scale of 0–10 than those who did not.Conclusions  Higher self-reported technical quality of care in diabetes appears to be frequently but not always associated with better experiences and ratings. It is possible that the former leads to the latter and/or that both share a common cause within providers. Both care aspects do not seem interchangeable during performance assessment.",
author = "O.A. Arah and B. Roset and D. Delnoij and N.S. Klazinga and K. Stronks",
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Arah, OA, Roset, B, Delnoij, D, Klazinga, NS & Stronks, K 2013, 'Associations between technical quality of diabetes care and patient experience', Health Expectations, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 136-145. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1369-7625.2011.00729.x

Associations between technical quality of diabetes care and patient experience. / Arah, O.A.; Roset, B.; Delnoij, D.; Klazinga, N.S.; Stronks, K.

In: Health Expectations, Vol. 16, No. 4, 2013, p. 136-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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N2 - Aims  It has long been held that high-quality care has both technical and interpersonal aspects. The nature and strength of any association between both aspects remain poorly explored. This study investigated the associations between diabetes patients’ reports of receiving recommended care (as measures of technical quality) and their experience and ratings (as measures of interpersonal care).Methods  Using data from a cross section of 3096 patients with diabetes nested within 24 diabetes-care-networks, we conducted multilevel regression analysis of the relationships between nine indicators of receiving care recommended in practice guidelines and: six scales of patient experience and global ratings of general practitioner, nurses, and overall diabetes care.Results  On average, reporting having received recommended care was associated with reporting better patient experience and ratings. The extent and frequencies of these associations varied across the different care processes. Receiving foot examination, physical activity advice, smoking status check, eye examination, and HbA1c testing, but not nutritional advice, urine, cholesterol or blood pressure checks, were statistically associated with better patient experience and global ratings. Those who received HbA1c testing rated their overall care 1.002 points higher (95% confidence interval: 0.726–1.278) on a scale of 0–10 than those who did not.Conclusions  Higher self-reported technical quality of care in diabetes appears to be frequently but not always associated with better experiences and ratings. It is possible that the former leads to the latter and/or that both share a common cause within providers. Both care aspects do not seem interchangeable during performance assessment.

AB - Aims  It has long been held that high-quality care has both technical and interpersonal aspects. The nature and strength of any association between both aspects remain poorly explored. This study investigated the associations between diabetes patients’ reports of receiving recommended care (as measures of technical quality) and their experience and ratings (as measures of interpersonal care).Methods  Using data from a cross section of 3096 patients with diabetes nested within 24 diabetes-care-networks, we conducted multilevel regression analysis of the relationships between nine indicators of receiving care recommended in practice guidelines and: six scales of patient experience and global ratings of general practitioner, nurses, and overall diabetes care.Results  On average, reporting having received recommended care was associated with reporting better patient experience and ratings. The extent and frequencies of these associations varied across the different care processes. Receiving foot examination, physical activity advice, smoking status check, eye examination, and HbA1c testing, but not nutritional advice, urine, cholesterol or blood pressure checks, were statistically associated with better patient experience and global ratings. Those who received HbA1c testing rated their overall care 1.002 points higher (95% confidence interval: 0.726–1.278) on a scale of 0–10 than those who did not.Conclusions  Higher self-reported technical quality of care in diabetes appears to be frequently but not always associated with better experiences and ratings. It is possible that the former leads to the latter and/or that both share a common cause within providers. Both care aspects do not seem interchangeable during performance assessment.

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