Attributions of people with intellectual disabilities of their own or other clients’ challenging behavior

A systematic review of qualitative studies

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Abstract

Introduction:
As opposed to studies focusing on staffs’ attributions of challenging behavior (CB), relatively few studies have looked at how people with intellectual disabilities (ID) attribute such behaviors themselves, and a systematic overview is currently lacking. The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence from qualitative studies on the attributions people with ID have concerning their own or other clients’ CB.

Methods:
A systematic literature search was conducted in Embase, Medline Ovid, Web of science, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO Ovid, and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they focused on people with ID who report on attributions of their own or other clients’ actual CB. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist.

Result:
A total of 10 studies were included. Three main types of factors subdivided in 13 sub-types were reported by clients as potential causes of CB: interpersonal factors (1 support staff, 2 other clients, 3 general, 4 life history), environmental factors (1 ward, 2 social exclusion, 3 situational factors) and intrapersonal factors (1 syndrome or diagnosis, 2 medical or physical symptoms, 3 psychological reasons, 4 emotions and feelings, 5 coping, 6 other).

Conclusions:
This thematic synthesis shows that clients with ID report a diverse range of attributions regarding their own or other clients’ CB. This spectrum can be used as a framework for interpreting CB and for the development of appropriate support systems for people with ID demonstrating CB.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2019

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Keywords

  • ADULTS
  • CARE STAFF ATTRIBUTIONS
  • DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF
  • EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
  • INDIVIDUALS
  • Intellectual disability
  • LEARNING-DISABILITY
  • MILD
  • PREVALENCE
  • VIOLENCE
  • WORKING
  • attributions
  • challenging behavior

Cite this

@article{a981797597884ac7b6ef478b825a3e03,
title = "Attributions of people with intellectual disabilities of their own or other clients’ challenging behavior: A systematic review of qualitative studies",
abstract = "Introduction: As opposed to studies focusing on staffs’ attributions of challenging behavior (CB), relatively few studies have looked at how people with intellectual disabilities (ID) attribute such behaviors themselves, and a systematic overview is currently lacking. The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence from qualitative studies on the attributions people with ID have concerning their own or other clients’ CB.Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in Embase, Medline Ovid, Web of science, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO Ovid, and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they focused on people with ID who report on attributions of their own or other clients’ actual CB. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist.Result: A total of 10 studies were included. Three main types of factors subdivided in 13 sub-types were reported by clients as potential causes of CB: interpersonal factors (1 support staff, 2 other clients, 3 general, 4 life history), environmental factors (1 ward, 2 social exclusion, 3 situational factors) and intrapersonal factors (1 syndrome or diagnosis, 2 medical or physical symptoms, 3 psychological reasons, 4 emotions and feelings, 5 coping, 6 other).Conclusions: This thematic synthesis shows that clients with ID report a diverse range of attributions regarding their own or other clients’ CB. This spectrum can be used as a framework for interpreting CB and for the development of appropriate support systems for people with ID demonstrating CB.",
keywords = "ADULTS, CARE STAFF ATTRIBUTIONS, DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF, EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE, INDIVIDUALS, Intellectual disability, LEARNING-DISABILITY, MILD, PREVALENCE, VIOLENCE, WORKING, attributions, challenging behavior",
author = "{van den Bogaard}, K.H.J.M. and M. Lugtenberg and S.L.P. Nijs and P.J.C.M. Embregts",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/19315864.2019.1636911",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities",
issn = "1931-5864",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attributions of people with intellectual disabilities of their own or other clients’ challenging behavior

T2 - A systematic review of qualitative studies

AU - van den Bogaard, K.H.J.M.

AU - Lugtenberg, M.

AU - Nijs, S.L.P.

AU - Embregts, P.J.C.M.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Introduction: As opposed to studies focusing on staffs’ attributions of challenging behavior (CB), relatively few studies have looked at how people with intellectual disabilities (ID) attribute such behaviors themselves, and a systematic overview is currently lacking. The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence from qualitative studies on the attributions people with ID have concerning their own or other clients’ CB.Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in Embase, Medline Ovid, Web of science, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO Ovid, and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they focused on people with ID who report on attributions of their own or other clients’ actual CB. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist.Result: A total of 10 studies were included. Three main types of factors subdivided in 13 sub-types were reported by clients as potential causes of CB: interpersonal factors (1 support staff, 2 other clients, 3 general, 4 life history), environmental factors (1 ward, 2 social exclusion, 3 situational factors) and intrapersonal factors (1 syndrome or diagnosis, 2 medical or physical symptoms, 3 psychological reasons, 4 emotions and feelings, 5 coping, 6 other).Conclusions: This thematic synthesis shows that clients with ID report a diverse range of attributions regarding their own or other clients’ CB. This spectrum can be used as a framework for interpreting CB and for the development of appropriate support systems for people with ID demonstrating CB.

AB - Introduction: As opposed to studies focusing on staffs’ attributions of challenging behavior (CB), relatively few studies have looked at how people with intellectual disabilities (ID) attribute such behaviors themselves, and a systematic overview is currently lacking. The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence from qualitative studies on the attributions people with ID have concerning their own or other clients’ CB.Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in Embase, Medline Ovid, Web of science, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsychINFO Ovid, and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they focused on people with ID who report on attributions of their own or other clients’ actual CB. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist.Result: A total of 10 studies were included. Three main types of factors subdivided in 13 sub-types were reported by clients as potential causes of CB: interpersonal factors (1 support staff, 2 other clients, 3 general, 4 life history), environmental factors (1 ward, 2 social exclusion, 3 situational factors) and intrapersonal factors (1 syndrome or diagnosis, 2 medical or physical symptoms, 3 psychological reasons, 4 emotions and feelings, 5 coping, 6 other).Conclusions: This thematic synthesis shows that clients with ID report a diverse range of attributions regarding their own or other clients’ CB. This spectrum can be used as a framework for interpreting CB and for the development of appropriate support systems for people with ID demonstrating CB.

KW - ADULTS

KW - CARE STAFF ATTRIBUTIONS

KW - DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF

KW - EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

KW - INDIVIDUALS

KW - Intellectual disability

KW - LEARNING-DISABILITY

KW - MILD

KW - PREVALENCE

KW - VIOLENCE

KW - WORKING

KW - attributions

KW - challenging behavior

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U2 - 10.1080/19315864.2019.1636911

DO - 10.1080/19315864.2019.1636911

M3 - Review article

JO - Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities

JF - Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities

SN - 1931-5864

ER -