Balancing individual and organizational goals in global talent management

A mutual-benefits perspective

E. Farndale, A. Pai, P. Sparrow, H. Scullion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Drawing from the talent management and global mobility literatures, there is simultaneous pressure to address both organizational goals to place talent internationally, and individual goals of self-initiated expatriation. This raises important questions for the future of global talent management (GTM): how might individual and organizational goals be balanced to the mutual benefit of both parties? Qualitative data from pilot studies in multinational corporations demonstrate a largely financially driven balancing act between self-initiated and organization-assigned expatriate assignments. Building primarily from psychological contract theory, this study builds propositions for future research, and explores the implications for global talent management practice.
Keywords: Global talent management, Global mobility, Organization-assigned expatriation, Self-initiated expatriation, Psychological contract theory
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)204-214
JournalJournal of World Business
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Global talent management
Expatriation
Contract theory
Psychological contract
Talent management
Expatriates
Key words
Multinational corporations
Assignment
Qualitative data
Management practices

Cite this

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abstract = "Drawing from the talent management and global mobility literatures, there is simultaneous pressure to address both organizational goals to place talent internationally, and individual goals of self-initiated expatriation. This raises important questions for the future of global talent management (GTM): how might individual and organizational goals be balanced to the mutual benefit of both parties? Qualitative data from pilot studies in multinational corporations demonstrate a largely financially driven balancing act between self-initiated and organization-assigned expatriate assignments. Building primarily from psychological contract theory, this study builds propositions for future research, and explores the implications for global talent management practice.Keywords: Global talent management, Global mobility, Organization-assigned expatriation, Self-initiated expatriation, Psychological contract theory",
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Balancing individual and organizational goals in global talent management : A mutual-benefits perspective. / Farndale, E.; Pai, A.; Sparrow, P.; Scullion, H.

In: Journal of World Business, Vol. 49, No. 2, 2014, p. 204-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - Balancing individual and organizational goals in global talent management

T2 - A mutual-benefits perspective

AU - Farndale, E.

AU - Pai, A.

AU - Sparrow, P.

AU - Scullion, H.

PY - 2014

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AB - Drawing from the talent management and global mobility literatures, there is simultaneous pressure to address both organizational goals to place talent internationally, and individual goals of self-initiated expatriation. This raises important questions for the future of global talent management (GTM): how might individual and organizational goals be balanced to the mutual benefit of both parties? Qualitative data from pilot studies in multinational corporations demonstrate a largely financially driven balancing act between self-initiated and organization-assigned expatriate assignments. Building primarily from psychological contract theory, this study builds propositions for future research, and explores the implications for global talent management practice.Keywords: Global talent management, Global mobility, Organization-assigned expatriation, Self-initiated expatriation, Psychological contract theory

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