Belief in reasoning

Janos Sarbo, Rein Cozijn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Reasoning has three types, deduction, induction, and abduction, of which we perceive deduction to be necessarily true, induction plausibly true, and abduction only hypothetically true. Syllogistic is a theory of deductive reasoning, introducing three figures of inferencing, of which figure-1 is obviously true, figure-3 and figure-2 are increasingly less transparent. We argue that the three figures of syllogistic and the three types of reasoning are related and their truth perceptions can be explained as different degrees of belief. We suggest that the source of this difference can be found in the conversion of a premise required by syllogistic processing. Experimental results illustrating our theory are included.
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages18
JournalCognitive Systems Research
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

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Keywords

  • semiotics
  • cognition
  • syllogism
  • reasoning
  • persuasion
  • discourse

Cite this

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Belief in reasoning. / Sarbo, Janos; Cozijn, Rein.

In: Cognitive Systems Research, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Belief in reasoning

AU - Sarbo, Janos

AU - Cozijn, Rein

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Reasoning has three types, deduction, induction, and abduction, of which we perceive deduction to be necessarily true, induction plausibly true, and abduction only hypothetically true. Syllogistic is a theory of deductive reasoning, introducing three figures of inferencing, of which figure-1 is obviously true, figure-3 and figure-2 are increasingly less transparent. We argue that the three figures of syllogistic and the three types of reasoning are related and their truth perceptions can be explained as different degrees of belief. We suggest that the source of this difference can be found in the conversion of a premise required by syllogistic processing. Experimental results illustrating our theory are included.

AB - Reasoning has three types, deduction, induction, and abduction, of which we perceive deduction to be necessarily true, induction plausibly true, and abduction only hypothetically true. Syllogistic is a theory of deductive reasoning, introducing three figures of inferencing, of which figure-1 is obviously true, figure-3 and figure-2 are increasingly less transparent. We argue that the three figures of syllogistic and the three types of reasoning are related and their truth perceptions can be explained as different degrees of belief. We suggest that the source of this difference can be found in the conversion of a premise required by syllogistic processing. Experimental results illustrating our theory are included.

KW - semiotics

KW - cognition

KW - syllogism

KW - reasoning

KW - persuasion

KW - discourse

M3 - Article

JO - Cognitive Systems Research

T2 - Cognitive Systems Research

JF - Cognitive Systems Research

SN - 1389-0417

ER -