Believe you can and you will: The belief in high self-control decreases interest in attractive alternatives

M.E. Hamburg, T.M. Pronk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

In the present research, we examined the effects of self-control beliefs on relationship protective behavior. We hypothesized that providing participants with feedback on their level of self-control would help them shield their relationship from attractive alternatives. Study 1 showed that romantically involved participants who received positive feedback on their level of self-control showed less interest in attractive alternatives as compared to participants who did not receive self-control feedback. Study 2 replicated these results and, additionally, showed that negative feedback increased interest in alternative others for romantically involved, but not for single participants. Together, these studies showed that in the context of close relationships, providing people with self-control feedback increases their ability to exercise self-control.
Keywords: Self-control, Romantic relationships, Infidelity
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-35
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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abstract = "In the present research, we examined the effects of self-control beliefs on relationship protective behavior. We hypothesized that providing participants with feedback on their level of self-control would help them shield their relationship from attractive alternatives. Study 1 showed that romantically involved participants who received positive feedback on their level of self-control showed less interest in attractive alternatives as compared to participants who did not receive self-control feedback. Study 2 replicated these results and, additionally, showed that negative feedback increased interest in alternative others for romantically involved, but not for single participants. Together, these studies showed that in the context of close relationships, providing people with self-control feedback increases their ability to exercise self-control.Keywords: Self-control, Romantic relationships, Infidelity",
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Believe you can and you will : The belief in high self-control decreases interest in attractive alternatives. / Hamburg, M.E.; Pronk, T.M.

In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 56, No. 1, 2015, p. 30-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - Believe you can and you will

T2 - The belief in high self-control decreases interest in attractive alternatives

AU - Hamburg, M.E.

AU - Pronk, T.M.

PY - 2015

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N2 - In the present research, we examined the effects of self-control beliefs on relationship protective behavior. We hypothesized that providing participants with feedback on their level of self-control would help them shield their relationship from attractive alternatives. Study 1 showed that romantically involved participants who received positive feedback on their level of self-control showed less interest in attractive alternatives as compared to participants who did not receive self-control feedback. Study 2 replicated these results and, additionally, showed that negative feedback increased interest in alternative others for romantically involved, but not for single participants. Together, these studies showed that in the context of close relationships, providing people with self-control feedback increases their ability to exercise self-control.Keywords: Self-control, Romantic relationships, Infidelity

AB - In the present research, we examined the effects of self-control beliefs on relationship protective behavior. We hypothesized that providing participants with feedback on their level of self-control would help them shield their relationship from attractive alternatives. Study 1 showed that romantically involved participants who received positive feedback on their level of self-control showed less interest in attractive alternatives as compared to participants who did not receive self-control feedback. Study 2 replicated these results and, additionally, showed that negative feedback increased interest in alternative others for romantically involved, but not for single participants. Together, these studies showed that in the context of close relationships, providing people with self-control feedback increases their ability to exercise self-control.Keywords: Self-control, Romantic relationships, Infidelity

U2 - 10.1016/j.jesp.2014.08.009

DO - 10.1016/j.jesp.2014.08.009

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