Beyond the 100 acre wood

In which international human rights law finds new ways to tame global corporate power

Daniel Augenstein, David Kinley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    Abstract

    States and corporations are being forced out of their comfort zones. A consensus is building among international human rights courts and committees that states can and will be held accountable for overseas human rights abuses by corporations domiciled in their respective territories. The authors suggest that this development is rooted in a transition from a territory-based to a subject-based approach to human rights obligations that de-centres international human rights law from state territory. In this article, they construct a conceptual framework for understanding how and why this is happening and articulate what are and will be the consequences for the theory and practice of international human rights law.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)828-848
    Number of pages21
    JournalThe International Journal of Human Rights
    Volume19
    Issue number6
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    human rights
    Law
    corporation
    overseas
    obligation
    abuse

    Keywords

    • human rights
    • globalisation
    • human rights and business
    • public-private divide
    • extraterritorial
    • UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights
    • multi-national corporation

    Cite this

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    Beyond the 100 acre wood : In which international human rights law finds new ways to tame global corporate power. / Augenstein, Daniel; Kinley, David .

    In: The International Journal of Human Rights, Vol. 19, No. 6, 2015, p. 828-848.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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