Black Lives Matter goes global: Connective action meets cultural hybridity in Brazil, India, and Japan

Saif Shahin*, Junki Nakahara, Mariana Sanchez

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the global diffusion of Black Lives Matter (BLM) as digitally networked connective action. Combining social network analysis with qualitative textual analysis, we show that BLM was hybridized in different ways to give voice to local struggles for social justice in Brazil, India, and Japan. However, BLM's hybridization stirred right-wing backlash within these countries that not only targeted local movements but BLM too. Theoretically, we argue that both transnational contiguities and intra-cultural tensions shape the construction of meanings-or "action frames"-as connective action crosses cultural borders. Resonant frames, which are in harmony with the values of the movement, amplify the features of the global movement that resonate with local concerns or hybridize it with a local struggle. Reactionary frames, which are hostile to movement values, may also target the global movement or its hybridization. We theorize the different roles of global and local crowd-enabled elites in transnational connective action.

Original languageEnglish
Article number14614448211057106
Number of pages20
JournalNew Media & Society
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Nov 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • BLM
  • globalization
  • hybridity
  • social change
  • social movement
  • Twitter
  • SOCIAL MEDIA
  • PROTEST
  • MOVEMENT
  • POLITICS
  • ACTIVISM
  • TIME

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