Blood and neuroimaging biomarkers of cognitive sequelae in breast cancer patients throughout chemotherapy: A systematic review

Gwen Schroyen*, Julie Vissers, Ann Smeets, Celine R. Gillebert, Jurgen Lemiere, Stefan Sunaert, Sabine Deprez, Charlotte Sleurs

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)
56 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Breast cancer treatment can induce alterations in blood-and neuroimaging-based markers. However, an overview of the predictive value of these markers for cognition is lacking for breast cancer survivors.

This systematic review summarized studies of the last decade, using the PubMed database, evaluating blood markers, and the association between blood-or structural neuroimaging markers and cognition across the chemotherapy trajectory for primary breast cancer, following PRISMA guidelines.

Forty-four studies were included. Differences were observed in all blood marker categories, from on-therapy until years post-chemotherapy. Associations were found between cognitive functioning and (1) blood markers (mainly inflammation-related) during, shortly-, or years post-chemotherapy and (2) white and gray matter metrics in frontal, temporal and parietal brain regions months up until years post-chemotherapy. Preliminary evidence exists for epigenetic and metabolic changes being associated with cognition, only after chemotherapy.

This review demonstrated time-dependent associations between specific blood-based and structural neuroimaging markers with cognitive impairment in patients with breast cancer. Future studies are encouraged to include both neuroimaging-and blood markers (e.g. of neuronal integrity, epigenetics and metabolism) to predict long-term cognitive effects of chemotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101297
Number of pages12
JournalTranslational Oncology
Volume16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Neuroimaging
  • Chemotherapy
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Biological markers
  • Breast cancer
  • ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY
  • WHITE-MATTER
  • SURVIVORS
  • IMPAIRMENT
  • CYTOKINES
  • WOMEN
  • ASSOCIATION
  • SYMPTOMS
  • MEMORY

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