Blood donor behaviour, motivations and the need for a systematic cross-cultural perspective: the example of moral outrage and health- and non-health-based philanthropy across seven countries

Eamonn Ferguson, Laszlo Dorner, Christopher R. France, Janis L. France, Barbara Masser, Michael Lam, Elena Marta, Sara Alfieri, Eva-Maria Merz, Byron Adams, Elisabeth Huis in ’t Veld, Josianne Scerri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
Blood donation is a prosocial altruistic act that is motived by the mechanisms that underlie altruism (e.g. warm‐glow, reciprocity, fairness/trust). Because there is consistent evidence that altruism and its mechanisms show cross‐cultural variability, in the present paper we make the case for a cross‐cultural perspective in blood donor research.

Methods
We analyse a subset of variables from a larger study, with samples drawn from seven countries (England, Malta, the Netherlands, Australia, the USA, Hungary, Italy: average N per country = 282). This subset of variables focuses on health (organ donor registration) and non‐health (volunteering, donating money) philanthropy, family traditions of helping and moral outrage as predictors of blood donor status.

Results
We show two cross‐cultural universals: (1) organ donor registration in opt‐in countries is positively associated with blood donor status and (2) non‐health philanthropy is generally unrelated to blood donor status. We also show two country‐specific effects: (1) a family tradition for helping is associated with blood donor status in Italy only and (2) moral outrage is a predictor only in the USA.

Conclusions
We contend that these findings provide proof of principle why a cross‐cultural perspective on blood donor behaviour is needed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-383
JournalISBT Science Series
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Altruism
Italy
Malta
Hungary
England
Netherlands

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Ferguson, Eamonn ; Dorner, Laszlo ; France, Christopher R. ; France, Janis L. ; Masser, Barbara ; Lam, Michael ; Marta, Elena ; Alfieri, Sara ; Merz, Eva-Maria ; Adams, Byron ; Huis in ’t Veld, Elisabeth ; Scerri, Josianne. / Blood donor behaviour, motivations and the need for a systematic cross-cultural perspective: the example of moral outrage and health- and non-health-based philanthropy across seven countries. In: ISBT Science Series. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 375-383.
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title = "Blood donor behaviour, motivations and the need for a systematic cross-cultural perspective: the example of moral outrage and health- and non-health-based philanthropy across seven countries",
abstract = "BackgroundBlood donation is a prosocial altruistic act that is motived by the mechanisms that underlie altruism (e.g. warm‐glow, reciprocity, fairness/trust). Because there is consistent evidence that altruism and its mechanisms show cross‐cultural variability, in the present paper we make the case for a cross‐cultural perspective in blood donor research.MethodsWe analyse a subset of variables from a larger study, with samples drawn from seven countries (England, Malta, the Netherlands, Australia, the USA, Hungary, Italy: average N per country = 282). This subset of variables focuses on health (organ donor registration) and non‐health (volunteering, donating money) philanthropy, family traditions of helping and moral outrage as predictors of blood donor status.ResultsWe show two cross‐cultural universals: (1) organ donor registration in opt‐in countries is positively associated with blood donor status and (2) non‐health philanthropy is generally unrelated to blood donor status. We also show two country‐specific effects: (1) a family tradition for helping is associated with blood donor status in Italy only and (2) moral outrage is a predictor only in the USA.ConclusionsWe contend that these findings provide proof of principle why a cross‐cultural perspective on blood donor behaviour is needed.",
author = "Eamonn Ferguson and Laszlo Dorner and France, {Christopher R.} and France, {Janis L.} and Barbara Masser and Michael Lam and Elena Marta and Sara Alfieri and Eva-Maria Merz and Byron Adams and {Huis in ’t Veld}, Elisabeth and Josianne Scerri",
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journal = "ISBT Science Series",
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Blood donor behaviour, motivations and the need for a systematic cross-cultural perspective: the example of moral outrage and health- and non-health-based philanthropy across seven countries. / Ferguson, Eamonn; Dorner, Laszlo; France, Christopher R.; France, Janis L.; Masser, Barbara; Lam, Michael; Marta, Elena; Alfieri, Sara; Merz, Eva-Maria; Adams, Byron; Huis in ’t Veld, Elisabeth; Scerri, Josianne.

In: ISBT Science Series, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2018, p. 375-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Blood donor behaviour, motivations and the need for a systematic cross-cultural perspective: the example of moral outrage and health- and non-health-based philanthropy across seven countries

AU - Ferguson, Eamonn

AU - Dorner, Laszlo

AU - France, Christopher R.

AU - France, Janis L.

AU - Masser, Barbara

AU - Lam, Michael

AU - Marta, Elena

AU - Alfieri, Sara

AU - Merz, Eva-Maria

AU - Adams, Byron

AU - Huis in ’t Veld, Elisabeth

AU - Scerri, Josianne

PY - 2018

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N2 - BackgroundBlood donation is a prosocial altruistic act that is motived by the mechanisms that underlie altruism (e.g. warm‐glow, reciprocity, fairness/trust). Because there is consistent evidence that altruism and its mechanisms show cross‐cultural variability, in the present paper we make the case for a cross‐cultural perspective in blood donor research.MethodsWe analyse a subset of variables from a larger study, with samples drawn from seven countries (England, Malta, the Netherlands, Australia, the USA, Hungary, Italy: average N per country = 282). This subset of variables focuses on health (organ donor registration) and non‐health (volunteering, donating money) philanthropy, family traditions of helping and moral outrage as predictors of blood donor status.ResultsWe show two cross‐cultural universals: (1) organ donor registration in opt‐in countries is positively associated with blood donor status and (2) non‐health philanthropy is generally unrelated to blood donor status. We also show two country‐specific effects: (1) a family tradition for helping is associated with blood donor status in Italy only and (2) moral outrage is a predictor only in the USA.ConclusionsWe contend that these findings provide proof of principle why a cross‐cultural perspective on blood donor behaviour is needed.

AB - BackgroundBlood donation is a prosocial altruistic act that is motived by the mechanisms that underlie altruism (e.g. warm‐glow, reciprocity, fairness/trust). Because there is consistent evidence that altruism and its mechanisms show cross‐cultural variability, in the present paper we make the case for a cross‐cultural perspective in blood donor research.MethodsWe analyse a subset of variables from a larger study, with samples drawn from seven countries (England, Malta, the Netherlands, Australia, the USA, Hungary, Italy: average N per country = 282). This subset of variables focuses on health (organ donor registration) and non‐health (volunteering, donating money) philanthropy, family traditions of helping and moral outrage as predictors of blood donor status.ResultsWe show two cross‐cultural universals: (1) organ donor registration in opt‐in countries is positively associated with blood donor status and (2) non‐health philanthropy is generally unrelated to blood donor status. We also show two country‐specific effects: (1) a family tradition for helping is associated with blood donor status in Italy only and (2) moral outrage is a predictor only in the USA.ConclusionsWe contend that these findings provide proof of principle why a cross‐cultural perspective on blood donor behaviour is needed.

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JO - ISBT Science Series

JF - ISBT Science Series

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