Brief report: Gender identity differences in autistic adults

Associations with perceptual and socio-cognitive profiles

R.J. Walsh, L. Krabbendam, J. Dewinter, S. Begeer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Prior research has shown an elevation in autism traits and diagnoses in individuals seen for gender related consultation and in participants self-identifying as transgender. To investigate this relationship between autism and gender identity from a new angle, we compared the self-reported autism traits and sensory differences between participants with autism who did or did not identify with their assigned sex (i.e. cisgender or trans and non-binary, respectively). We found broad elevation of most cognitive autism traits in the trans and non-binary group (those who identified with a gender other than their assigned gender), and lower visual and auditory hypersensitivity. We contrast these data to existing hypotheses and propose a role for autistic resistance to social conditioning.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4070–4078
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume48
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Keywords

  • Autism
  • Bayesian cognition
  • CHILDREN
  • CONGENITAL ADRENAL-HYPERPLASIA
  • DYSPHORIA
  • FUNCTIONING AUTISM
  • Gender dysphoria
  • Gender identity
  • HUMAN BRAIN
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • PEOPLE
  • PERVASIVE DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS
  • Perception
  • SPECTRUM QUOTIENT AQ
  • TRAITS
  • Transgender

Cite this

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abstract = "Prior research has shown an elevation in autism traits and diagnoses in individuals seen for gender related consultation and in participants self-identifying as transgender. To investigate this relationship between autism and gender identity from a new angle, we compared the self-reported autism traits and sensory differences between participants with autism who did or did not identify with their assigned sex (i.e. cisgender or trans and non-binary, respectively). We found broad elevation of most cognitive autism traits in the trans and non-binary group (those who identified with a gender other than their assigned gender), and lower visual and auditory hypersensitivity. We contrast these data to existing hypotheses and propose a role for autistic resistance to social conditioning.",
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Brief report: Gender identity differences in autistic adults : Associations with perceptual and socio-cognitive profiles. / Walsh, R.J.; Krabbendam, L.; Dewinter, J.; Begeer, S.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 48, No. 12, 2018, p. 4070–4078.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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