Business intelligence design for live piloting of order fulfilment centers

J. Ashayeri, B. Montreuil, J. Lagerwaard, G. Janssen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Other fulfillment centers focus on fast paced timely preparation and outbound shipment of customer orders from a large mix of temporarily stored inbound products acquired to satisfy these orders. In order to be both price and service competitive, such fulfillers thrive on real-time synchronization and bee-hive efficiency in highly turbulent demand an supply. Originally conceived for simpler slower pace warehouses and distribution centers, warehouse management systems (WMS) have been transplanted for use in fulfillers. They help fulfillers survive the complexity, yet at the cost of lower productivity and service levels. This paper proposes enhancing WMS with business intelligence to create a Fulfiller Piloting System (FPS). The aim is to enable smart live piloting of fulfillers, exploiting the real-time feed of information fro both sides of the fulfiller's demand and supply network, as well as from its internal operations. A FPS drives for dynamic distributed synchronization of operations and optimization of decisions by a combination of human and virtual agents, with the objective of higher overall productivity and service.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Material Handling Research Colloquium (IMHRC 2008)
EditorsK. Ellis, R. Meller, M.K. Ogle, B.A. Peters, G.D. Taylor, J. Usher
Place of PublicationCharlotte, NC
PublisherMaterial Handling Institute
ISBN (Print)9781882780150
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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Synchronization
Productivity
Business intelligence
Warehouse management
Management system
Order fulfillment
Demand and supply
Distribution center
Supply network
Preparation
Warehouse
Service levels

Cite this

Ashayeri, J., Montreuil, B., Lagerwaard, J., & Janssen, G. (2008). Business intelligence design for live piloting of order fulfilment centers. In K. Ellis, R. Meller, M. K. Ogle, B. A. Peters, G. D. Taylor, & J. Usher (Eds.), Proceedings of the International Material Handling Research Colloquium (IMHRC 2008) Charlotte, NC: Material Handling Institute.
Ashayeri, J. ; Montreuil, B. ; Lagerwaard, J. ; Janssen, G. / Business intelligence design for live piloting of order fulfilment centers. Proceedings of the International Material Handling Research Colloquium (IMHRC 2008). editor / K. Ellis ; R. Meller ; M.K. Ogle ; B.A. Peters ; G.D. Taylor ; J. Usher. Charlotte, NC : Material Handling Institute, 2008.
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Ashayeri, J, Montreuil, B, Lagerwaard, J & Janssen, G 2008, Business intelligence design for live piloting of order fulfilment centers. in K Ellis, R Meller, MK Ogle, BA Peters, GD Taylor & J Usher (eds), Proceedings of the International Material Handling Research Colloquium (IMHRC 2008). Material Handling Institute, Charlotte, NC.

Business intelligence design for live piloting of order fulfilment centers. / Ashayeri, J.; Montreuil, B.; Lagerwaard, J.; Janssen, G.

Proceedings of the International Material Handling Research Colloquium (IMHRC 2008). ed. / K. Ellis; R. Meller; M.K. Ogle; B.A. Peters; G.D. Taylor; J. Usher. Charlotte, NC : Material Handling Institute, 2008.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

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Ashayeri J, Montreuil B, Lagerwaard J, Janssen G. Business intelligence design for live piloting of order fulfilment centers. In Ellis K, Meller R, Ogle MK, Peters BA, Taylor GD, Usher J, editors, Proceedings of the International Material Handling Research Colloquium (IMHRC 2008). Charlotte, NC: Material Handling Institute. 2008