Case-specific colleague guidance for general practitioners' management of sickness absence

H.P. Nordhagen, S. Harvey, E.O. Rosvold, D. Bruusgaard, R.W.B. Blonk, A. Mykletun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
General practitioners (GPs) report sickness absence certification as challenging. They express need for support with functional assessment beyond guidelines and reforms. Case-specific collegial one-to-one guidance for other clinical topics has proved popular with GPs and may be an acceptable and effective way to improve GPs skills and competence in sickness absence certification.
Aims
To present a new model of case-specific colleague guidance focusing on the management of long-term sickness absence and to describe its feasibility in terms of application and reception among GPs, and also GPs’ self-reports of effects on their practice.
Methods
Randomly selected GPs received case-specific collegial guidance over a 12-month period, in two Norwegian trials, delivered by former GPs employed by the social security administration. We measured reception and perceived effects by GPs’ self-report and registered participation and withdrawal rates.
Results
The participation rate (n = 165) was 94%, and no GPs withdrew during training. Among the 116 GPs responding to the survey (70%), 112 (97%; 95% CI 92–99) stated they would recommend it to their colleagues. Considerable benefit from the guidance was reported by 68 (59%; 95% CI 50–68). The GPs self-reported other effects on their sickness absence certification, specifically an increased use of part-time sickness absence (Fit-Note equivalent).
Conclusions
This model of case-specific colleague guidance to aid GPs’ management of long-term sickness absence is feasible and was popular. This type of guidance was perceived by GPs to be somewhat beneficial and to alter their sickness absence certification behaviour, though the true impact requires further testing in controlled trials.
Keywords: Absenteeism, colleague-based guidance, Fit-Notes, general practitioner, occupational health, occupational health physicians, partial sickness absence, sickness absence
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)644-647
JournalOccupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume67
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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General Practitioners
Self Report
United States Social Security Administration
Absenteeism
Occupational Health
Mental Competency

Cite this

Nordhagen, H.P. ; Harvey, S. ; Rosvold, E.O. ; Bruusgaard, D. ; Blonk, R.W.B. ; Mykletun, A. / Case-specific colleague guidance for general practitioners' management of sickness absence. In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 67, No. 8. pp. 644-647.
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title = "Case-specific colleague guidance for general practitioners' management of sickness absence",
abstract = "BackgroundGeneral practitioners (GPs) report sickness absence certification as challenging. They express need for support with functional assessment beyond guidelines and reforms. Case-specific collegial one-to-one guidance for other clinical topics has proved popular with GPs and may be an acceptable and effective way to improve GPs skills and competence in sickness absence certification.AimsTo present a new model of case-specific colleague guidance focusing on the management of long-term sickness absence and to describe its feasibility in terms of application and reception among GPs, and also GPs’ self-reports of effects on their practice.MethodsRandomly selected GPs received case-specific collegial guidance over a 12-month period, in two Norwegian trials, delivered by former GPs employed by the social security administration. We measured reception and perceived effects by GPs’ self-report and registered participation and withdrawal rates.ResultsThe participation rate (n = 165) was 94{\%}, and no GPs withdrew during training. Among the 116 GPs responding to the survey (70{\%}), 112 (97{\%}; 95{\%} CI 92–99) stated they would recommend it to their colleagues. Considerable benefit from the guidance was reported by 68 (59{\%}; 95{\%} CI 50–68). The GPs self-reported other effects on their sickness absence certification, specifically an increased use of part-time sickness absence (Fit-Note equivalent).ConclusionsThis model of case-specific colleague guidance to aid GPs’ management of long-term sickness absence is feasible and was popular. This type of guidance was perceived by GPs to be somewhat beneficial and to alter their sickness absence certification behaviour, though the true impact requires further testing in controlled trials.Keywords: Absenteeism, colleague-based guidance, Fit-Notes, general practitioner, occupational health, occupational health physicians, partial sickness absence, sickness absence",
author = "H.P. Nordhagen and S. Harvey and E.O. Rosvold and D. Bruusgaard and R.W.B. Blonk and A. Mykletun",
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Case-specific colleague guidance for general practitioners' management of sickness absence. / Nordhagen, H.P.; Harvey, S.; Rosvold, E.O.; Bruusgaard, D.; Blonk, R.W.B.; Mykletun, A.

In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 67, No. 8, 2017, p. 644-647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Case-specific colleague guidance for general practitioners' management of sickness absence

AU - Nordhagen, H.P.

AU - Harvey, S.

AU - Rosvold, E.O.

AU - Bruusgaard, D.

AU - Blonk, R.W.B.

AU - Mykletun, A.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - BackgroundGeneral practitioners (GPs) report sickness absence certification as challenging. They express need for support with functional assessment beyond guidelines and reforms. Case-specific collegial one-to-one guidance for other clinical topics has proved popular with GPs and may be an acceptable and effective way to improve GPs skills and competence in sickness absence certification.AimsTo present a new model of case-specific colleague guidance focusing on the management of long-term sickness absence and to describe its feasibility in terms of application and reception among GPs, and also GPs’ self-reports of effects on their practice.MethodsRandomly selected GPs received case-specific collegial guidance over a 12-month period, in two Norwegian trials, delivered by former GPs employed by the social security administration. We measured reception and perceived effects by GPs’ self-report and registered participation and withdrawal rates.ResultsThe participation rate (n = 165) was 94%, and no GPs withdrew during training. Among the 116 GPs responding to the survey (70%), 112 (97%; 95% CI 92–99) stated they would recommend it to their colleagues. Considerable benefit from the guidance was reported by 68 (59%; 95% CI 50–68). The GPs self-reported other effects on their sickness absence certification, specifically an increased use of part-time sickness absence (Fit-Note equivalent).ConclusionsThis model of case-specific colleague guidance to aid GPs’ management of long-term sickness absence is feasible and was popular. This type of guidance was perceived by GPs to be somewhat beneficial and to alter their sickness absence certification behaviour, though the true impact requires further testing in controlled trials.Keywords: Absenteeism, colleague-based guidance, Fit-Notes, general practitioner, occupational health, occupational health physicians, partial sickness absence, sickness absence

AB - BackgroundGeneral practitioners (GPs) report sickness absence certification as challenging. They express need for support with functional assessment beyond guidelines and reforms. Case-specific collegial one-to-one guidance for other clinical topics has proved popular with GPs and may be an acceptable and effective way to improve GPs skills and competence in sickness absence certification.AimsTo present a new model of case-specific colleague guidance focusing on the management of long-term sickness absence and to describe its feasibility in terms of application and reception among GPs, and also GPs’ self-reports of effects on their practice.MethodsRandomly selected GPs received case-specific collegial guidance over a 12-month period, in two Norwegian trials, delivered by former GPs employed by the social security administration. We measured reception and perceived effects by GPs’ self-report and registered participation and withdrawal rates.ResultsThe participation rate (n = 165) was 94%, and no GPs withdrew during training. Among the 116 GPs responding to the survey (70%), 112 (97%; 95% CI 92–99) stated they would recommend it to their colleagues. Considerable benefit from the guidance was reported by 68 (59%; 95% CI 50–68). The GPs self-reported other effects on their sickness absence certification, specifically an increased use of part-time sickness absence (Fit-Note equivalent).ConclusionsThis model of case-specific colleague guidance to aid GPs’ management of long-term sickness absence is feasible and was popular. This type of guidance was perceived by GPs to be somewhat beneficial and to alter their sickness absence certification behaviour, though the true impact requires further testing in controlled trials.Keywords: Absenteeism, colleague-based guidance, Fit-Notes, general practitioner, occupational health, occupational health physicians, partial sickness absence, sickness absence

U2 - 10.1093/occmed/kqx120

DO - 10.1093/occmed/kqx120

M3 - Article

VL - 67

SP - 644

EP - 647

JO - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1351-0711

IS - 8

ER -