Child-rearing values: The impact of intergenerational class mobility

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
92 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study contrasts two theoretical perspectives on the relationship between intergenerational class mobility and child-rearing values. According to the dissociative thesis, which describes social mobility as a disruptive experience leading to insecurity, social isolation, stress and frustration, socially mobile individuals less often prefer community-oriented qualities such as tolerance and respect for other people, unselfishness, good manners and obedience. The beneficiary thesis, on the other hand, predicts that socially mobile individuals have a stronger preference for individual-based values such as hard work, determination, responsibility, independence and thrift. In both cases, these mobility effects are thought to be stronger for more extremely mobile individuals and for downwardly mobile compared with upwardly mobile individuals. However, using Dutch data from the European Values Study 2008, hardly any significant intergenerational mobility effects are found. Maybe intergenerational mobility is not such an extraordinary experience as mobility theory would lead us to believe, or mobile individuals adjust themselves very quickly to their new situation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-390
JournalInternational Sociology
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Child-rearing
  • intergenerational mobility
  • social class
  • values
  • PARENTAL SOCIALIZATION VALUES
  • SOCIAL-MOBILITY
  • OCCUPATIONAL-MOBILITY
  • INEQUALITY
  • MODELS
  • NETHERLANDS
  • FERTILITY
  • RELIGION
  • HABITUS

Cite this