Chronic mental health problems and use of mental health services among adults with and without adverse childhood experiences: a 6-year longitudinal population-based study

P.G. van der Velden*, Hedwig van Bakel, Evi de Cock, Carlo Contino, J.W.M. Das

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
The negative effects of single and multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACE)
on adult mental health are well-documented. However, little is known about the
prevalence of chronic mental health problems (MHP) and use of mental health
services (MHS) compared to adults without an ACE history.

Aims
Examine differences in the prevalence of chronic MHP and MHS use between
adults without and with a single and multiple ACE history, and MHS use among
ACE and no-ACE adults with chronic MHP.

Method
A 6-year longitudinal study was conducted based on a random sample of the
Dutch adult population (n=2,427).

Results
Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that adults with a single (n=280)
and multiple ACE (n=92) history suffered more often from chronic MHP such as
chronic depressive and anxiety symptoms. Both ACE subgroups also made
greater use of MHS than no-ACE adults (n=2,055). Multiple ACE compared to
single ACE, increased the risk of MHP. However, among those with chronic
MHP respondents with and without an ACE history did not differ in MHS use.

Conclusions
ACE history is strongly related to chronic MHP and persistent use of MHS.
However, MHS use among those with chronic MHP is not related to an ACE
history.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Mental Health
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Adverse childhood experiences
  • Anxiety and depressive symptoms
  • Mental health services use
  • Sleep problems
  • Fatigue
  • Longitudinal
  • Population

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