Cognitive functioning and predictors thereof in patients with 1–10 brain metastases selected for stereotactic radiosurgery

Wietske C. M. Schimmel*, Karin Gehring, Patrick E. J. Hanssens, Margriet M. Sitskoorn

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Purpose
Information on predictive factors of cognitive functioning in patients with (multiple) brain metastases (BM) selected for radiosurgery may allow for more individual care and may play a role in predicting cognitive outcome after radiosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive performance, and predictors thereof, in patients with 1–10 BM before radiosurgery.
Methods
Cognition was measured before radiosurgery using a standardized neuropsychological test battery in patients with 1–10 BM (expected survival > 3 months; KPS ≥ 70; no prior BM treatment). Regression formulae were constructed to calculate sociodemographically corrected z scores. Group and individual cognitive functioning was analyzed. Multivariable regression was used to explore potential predictors.
Results
Patients (N = 92) performed significantly worse than controls (N = 104) on all 11 test variables (medium-large effect sizes for 8 variables). Percentages of impairment were highest for information processing (55.3%), dexterity (43.2%) and cognitive flexibility (28.7%). 62% and 46% of patients had impairments in at least two, or three test variables, respectively. Models including combinations of clinical and psychological variables were predictive of verbal memory, psychomotor speed, information processing and dexterity. Neither number nor volume of metastases predicted patients’ test performance.
Conclusions
Already before radiosurgery, almost half of the patients suffered from severe cognitive deficits in at least three test variables. At group and individual level, information processing, cognitive flexibility, and dexterity were most affected. These cognitive impairments may impair daily functioning and patients’ ability to make (shared) treatment decisions. Both clinical (symptomatic BM; timing of BM diagnosis) and psychological (mental fatigue) characteristics influenced cognitive performance.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Neuro-Oncology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2019

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@article{faaa976114254e2ba508016264e36efb,
title = "Cognitive functioning and predictors thereof in patients with 1–10 brain metastases selected for stereotactic radiosurgery",
abstract = "PurposeInformation on predictive factors of cognitive functioning in patients with (multiple) brain metastases (BM) selected for radiosurgery may allow for more individual care and may play a role in predicting cognitive outcome after radiosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive performance, and predictors thereof, in patients with 1–10 BM before radiosurgery.MethodsCognition was measured before radiosurgery using a standardized neuropsychological test battery in patients with 1–10 BM (expected survival > 3 months; KPS ≥ 70; no prior BM treatment). Regression formulae were constructed to calculate sociodemographically corrected z scores. Group and individual cognitive functioning was analyzed. Multivariable regression was used to explore potential predictors.ResultsPatients (N = 92) performed significantly worse than controls (N = 104) on all 11 test variables (medium-large effect sizes for 8 variables). Percentages of impairment were highest for information processing (55.3{\%}), dexterity (43.2{\%}) and cognitive flexibility (28.7{\%}). 62{\%} and 46{\%} of patients had impairments in at least two, or three test variables, respectively. Models including combinations of clinical and psychological variables were predictive of verbal memory, psychomotor speed, information processing and dexterity. Neither number nor volume of metastases predicted patients’ test performance.ConclusionsAlready before radiosurgery, almost half of the patients suffered from severe cognitive deficits in at least three test variables. At group and individual level, information processing, cognitive flexibility, and dexterity were most affected. These cognitive impairments may impair daily functioning and patients’ ability to make (shared) treatment decisions. Both clinical (symptomatic BM; timing of BM diagnosis) and psychological (mental fatigue) characteristics influenced cognitive performance.",
author = "Schimmel, {Wietske C. M.} and Karin Gehring and Hanssens, {Patrick E. J.} and Sitskoorn, {Margriet M.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1007/s11060-019-03292-y",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Neuro-Oncology",
issn = "0167-594X",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic Publishers",

}

Cognitive functioning and predictors thereof in patients with 1–10 brain metastases selected for stereotactic radiosurgery. / Schimmel, Wietske C. M.; Gehring, Karin; Hanssens, Patrick E. J.; Sitskoorn, Margriet M.

In: Journal of Neuro-Oncology, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cognitive functioning and predictors thereof in patients with 1–10 brain metastases selected for stereotactic radiosurgery

AU - Schimmel, Wietske C. M.

AU - Gehring, Karin

AU - Hanssens, Patrick E. J.

AU - Sitskoorn, Margriet M.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - PurposeInformation on predictive factors of cognitive functioning in patients with (multiple) brain metastases (BM) selected for radiosurgery may allow for more individual care and may play a role in predicting cognitive outcome after radiosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive performance, and predictors thereof, in patients with 1–10 BM before radiosurgery.MethodsCognition was measured before radiosurgery using a standardized neuropsychological test battery in patients with 1–10 BM (expected survival > 3 months; KPS ≥ 70; no prior BM treatment). Regression formulae were constructed to calculate sociodemographically corrected z scores. Group and individual cognitive functioning was analyzed. Multivariable regression was used to explore potential predictors.ResultsPatients (N = 92) performed significantly worse than controls (N = 104) on all 11 test variables (medium-large effect sizes for 8 variables). Percentages of impairment were highest for information processing (55.3%), dexterity (43.2%) and cognitive flexibility (28.7%). 62% and 46% of patients had impairments in at least two, or three test variables, respectively. Models including combinations of clinical and psychological variables were predictive of verbal memory, psychomotor speed, information processing and dexterity. Neither number nor volume of metastases predicted patients’ test performance.ConclusionsAlready before radiosurgery, almost half of the patients suffered from severe cognitive deficits in at least three test variables. At group and individual level, information processing, cognitive flexibility, and dexterity were most affected. These cognitive impairments may impair daily functioning and patients’ ability to make (shared) treatment decisions. Both clinical (symptomatic BM; timing of BM diagnosis) and psychological (mental fatigue) characteristics influenced cognitive performance.

AB - PurposeInformation on predictive factors of cognitive functioning in patients with (multiple) brain metastases (BM) selected for radiosurgery may allow for more individual care and may play a role in predicting cognitive outcome after radiosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate cognitive performance, and predictors thereof, in patients with 1–10 BM before radiosurgery.MethodsCognition was measured before radiosurgery using a standardized neuropsychological test battery in patients with 1–10 BM (expected survival > 3 months; KPS ≥ 70; no prior BM treatment). Regression formulae were constructed to calculate sociodemographically corrected z scores. Group and individual cognitive functioning was analyzed. Multivariable regression was used to explore potential predictors.ResultsPatients (N = 92) performed significantly worse than controls (N = 104) on all 11 test variables (medium-large effect sizes for 8 variables). Percentages of impairment were highest for information processing (55.3%), dexterity (43.2%) and cognitive flexibility (28.7%). 62% and 46% of patients had impairments in at least two, or three test variables, respectively. Models including combinations of clinical and psychological variables were predictive of verbal memory, psychomotor speed, information processing and dexterity. Neither number nor volume of metastases predicted patients’ test performance.ConclusionsAlready before radiosurgery, almost half of the patients suffered from severe cognitive deficits in at least three test variables. At group and individual level, information processing, cognitive flexibility, and dexterity were most affected. These cognitive impairments may impair daily functioning and patients’ ability to make (shared) treatment decisions. Both clinical (symptomatic BM; timing of BM diagnosis) and psychological (mental fatigue) characteristics influenced cognitive performance.

U2 - 10.1007/s11060-019-03292-y

DO - 10.1007/s11060-019-03292-y

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Neuro-Oncology

JF - Journal of Neuro-Oncology

SN - 0167-594X

ER -