Comment on "Providing information promotes greater public support for potable recycled water" by Fielding, KS and Roiko, AH, 2014 [Water Research 61, 86-96]

Willem de Koster, Peter Achterberg

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Letter to the editorScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Recently, Fielding and Roiko found that information provision affects knowledge of and support for potable recycled water. However, recent cultural sociological insights suggest that such effects are not universal. A re-analysis of the original data reveals the relevance of cultural predispositions: significant effects only exist in specific subgroups of the population. Only those who are comfortable with new technologies prove receptive to new information about potable recycled water. These findings are relevant for scholars aiming to uncover the mechanisms through which information affects public opinion, and for policymakers trying to overcome community resistance to alternative water sources. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)372-374
Number of pages3
JournalWater Resources Research
Volume84
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2015

Keywords

  • Communication research
  • Cultural sociology
  • Information provision
  • Persuasive communication
  • Potable recycled water
  • Public acceptance

Cite this

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title = "Comment on {"}Providing information promotes greater public support for potable recycled water{"} by Fielding, KS and Roiko, AH, 2014 [Water Research 61, 86-96]",
abstract = "Recently, Fielding and Roiko found that information provision affects knowledge of and support for potable recycled water. However, recent cultural sociological insights suggest that such effects are not universal. A re-analysis of the original data reveals the relevance of cultural predispositions: significant effects only exist in specific subgroups of the population. Only those who are comfortable with new technologies prove receptive to new information about potable recycled water. These findings are relevant for scholars aiming to uncover the mechanisms through which information affects public opinion, and for policymakers trying to overcome community resistance to alternative water sources. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Communication research, Cultural sociology, Information provision, Persuasive communication, Potable recycled water, Public acceptance",
author = "{de Koster}, Willem and Peter Achterberg",
year = "2015",
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doi = "10.1016/j.watres.2015.05.067",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "372--374",
journal = "Water Resources Research",
issn = "0043-1397",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

Comment on "Providing information promotes greater public support for potable recycled water" by Fielding, KS and Roiko, AH, 2014 [Water Research 61, 86-96]. / de Koster, Willem; Achterberg, Peter.

In: Water Resources Research, Vol. 84, 01.11.2015, p. 372-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Letter to the editorScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comment on "Providing information promotes greater public support for potable recycled water" by Fielding, KS and Roiko, AH, 2014 [Water Research 61, 86-96]

AU - de Koster, Willem

AU - Achterberg, Peter

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - Recently, Fielding and Roiko found that information provision affects knowledge of and support for potable recycled water. However, recent cultural sociological insights suggest that such effects are not universal. A re-analysis of the original data reveals the relevance of cultural predispositions: significant effects only exist in specific subgroups of the population. Only those who are comfortable with new technologies prove receptive to new information about potable recycled water. These findings are relevant for scholars aiming to uncover the mechanisms through which information affects public opinion, and for policymakers trying to overcome community resistance to alternative water sources. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Recently, Fielding and Roiko found that information provision affects knowledge of and support for potable recycled water. However, recent cultural sociological insights suggest that such effects are not universal. A re-analysis of the original data reveals the relevance of cultural predispositions: significant effects only exist in specific subgroups of the population. Only those who are comfortable with new technologies prove receptive to new information about potable recycled water. These findings are relevant for scholars aiming to uncover the mechanisms through which information affects public opinion, and for policymakers trying to overcome community resistance to alternative water sources. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Communication research

KW - Cultural sociology

KW - Information provision

KW - Persuasive communication

KW - Potable recycled water

KW - Public acceptance

U2 - 10.1016/j.watres.2015.05.067

DO - 10.1016/j.watres.2015.05.067

M3 - Comment/Letter to the editor

VL - 84

SP - 372

EP - 374

JO - Water Resources Research

JF - Water Resources Research

SN - 0043-1397

ER -