Comparing a playful interactive product to watching television: An exploratory study for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

P.J.C.M. Embregts, W. van Oorsouw, S. Wintels, R. van Delden, V. Evers, D. Reidsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background:
New technologies could broaden activities for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). This study compared watching television with a newly-developed interactive ball.

Method:
The ball responded with sounds, lights, and wiggling to the player’s voice and movements. Five control sessions (watching television) were compared to five experimental sessions (interactive ball). Observations were evaluated with 10s-partial-interval recording focussed on indicators of alertness and affect, yielding 900 measurements/participant. Data were analysed with Nonoverlap-of-All-Pairs analyses and visual inspection.

Results:
Four out of nine participants responded positively to the ball regarding alertness. Three of them also showed positive changes regarding affective behaviour. For three participants, responses were comparable to television sessions. Finally, responses of two participants appeared difficult to observe.

Conclusions:
Responses to the ball varied widely, which fits the heterogeneous character of the targetgroup. Results are reasonably encouraging when it comes to the development and implications of interactive technologies for people with PIMD.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2019

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television
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@article{413e1cb6726a4225bdfb2760d762cd25,
title = "Comparing a playful interactive product to watching television: An exploratory study for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities",
abstract = "Background: New technologies could broaden activities for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). This study compared watching television with a newly-developed interactive ball.Method: The ball responded with sounds, lights, and wiggling to the player’s voice and movements. Five control sessions (watching television) were compared to five experimental sessions (interactive ball). Observations were evaluated with 10s-partial-interval recording focussed on indicators of alertness and affect, yielding 900 measurements/participant. Data were analysed with Nonoverlap-of-All-Pairs analyses and visual inspection.Results: Four out of nine participants responded positively to the ball regarding alertness. Three of them also showed positive changes regarding affective behaviour. For three participants, responses were comparable to television sessions. Finally, responses of two participants appeared difficult to observe.Conclusions: Responses to the ball varied widely, which fits the heterogeneous character of the targetgroup. Results are reasonably encouraging when it comes to the development and implications of interactive technologies for people with PIMD.",
author = "P.J.C.M. Embregts and {van Oorsouw}, W. and S. Wintels and {van Delden}, R. and V. Evers and D. Reidsma",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.3109/13668250.2018.1537846",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability",
issn = "1366-8250",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing a playful interactive product to watching television

T2 - An exploratory study for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

AU - Embregts, P.J.C.M.

AU - van Oorsouw, W.

AU - Wintels, S.

AU - van Delden, R.

AU - Evers, V.

AU - Reidsma, D.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background: New technologies could broaden activities for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). This study compared watching television with a newly-developed interactive ball.Method: The ball responded with sounds, lights, and wiggling to the player’s voice and movements. Five control sessions (watching television) were compared to five experimental sessions (interactive ball). Observations were evaluated with 10s-partial-interval recording focussed on indicators of alertness and affect, yielding 900 measurements/participant. Data were analysed with Nonoverlap-of-All-Pairs analyses and visual inspection.Results: Four out of nine participants responded positively to the ball regarding alertness. Three of them also showed positive changes regarding affective behaviour. For three participants, responses were comparable to television sessions. Finally, responses of two participants appeared difficult to observe.Conclusions: Responses to the ball varied widely, which fits the heterogeneous character of the targetgroup. Results are reasonably encouraging when it comes to the development and implications of interactive technologies for people with PIMD.

AB - Background: New technologies could broaden activities for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). This study compared watching television with a newly-developed interactive ball.Method: The ball responded with sounds, lights, and wiggling to the player’s voice and movements. Five control sessions (watching television) were compared to five experimental sessions (interactive ball). Observations were evaluated with 10s-partial-interval recording focussed on indicators of alertness and affect, yielding 900 measurements/participant. Data were analysed with Nonoverlap-of-All-Pairs analyses and visual inspection.Results: Four out of nine participants responded positively to the ball regarding alertness. Three of them also showed positive changes regarding affective behaviour. For three participants, responses were comparable to television sessions. Finally, responses of two participants appeared difficult to observe.Conclusions: Responses to the ball varied widely, which fits the heterogeneous character of the targetgroup. Results are reasonably encouraging when it comes to the development and implications of interactive technologies for people with PIMD.

U2 - 10.3109/13668250.2018.1537846

DO - 10.3109/13668250.2018.1537846

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

JF - Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability

SN - 1366-8250

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