Connected languages

Effects of intensifying contact between Turkish and Dutch

Derya Demirçay

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisScientific

132 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In today’s globalized world movement of people, information and knowledge is made easier each passing day. Thus, isolated, monolingual communities are rare in the modern world. This dissertation looks into bilinguals’ use of their languages within the community of Turkish-Dutch speakers in the Netherlands. It studies recordings of naturally occurring bilingual conversations among friend groups and monolingual interviews with second generation bilinguals. It approaches language as a usage-based system that is entirely made up of units which differ only in their degree of complexity, their degree of schematicity (a continuum from schematic, or open to lexical selection, to specific, or ‘lexically filled’) and in how entrenched they are. The speakers’ use of code-switching as well as the structural and lexical aspects of their Turkish are studied from this usage-based perspective to gain a deeper insight into how factors like frequency of use and semantic specificity affect their language use. The results of the analysis of their everyday in-group use of both Dutch and Turkish is used to reassess the conventional typology of code-switching patterns. Their Turkish is studied in order to assess whether changes that are found, in the form of deviations from Turkish as spoken in Turkey, might be explained by language contact. Contact-induced language change is a relatively new source of empirical data for usage-based linguistics; exploring the combination of theoretical perspective and empirical data allows us to further deepen our understanding of what drives language use and how the changes it makes visible can be explained.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Tilburg University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Backus, Albert, Promotor
  • Blommaert, Jan, Promotor
  • Yagmur, Kutlay, Member PhD commission
  • Treffers-Daller, J., Member PhD commission, External person
  • Verschik, A., Member PhD commission, External person
  • Quick, A., Member PhD commission, External person
Award date21 Dec 2017
Place of PublicationUtrecht
Publisher
Print ISBNs9789460932724
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

contact
language
language change
earning a doctorate
community
recording
typology
Turkey
Netherlands
conversation
Group
semantics
linguistics
interview

Cite this

@phdthesis{b7cb580652114ec1b577fe9b0eecca15,
title = "Connected languages: Effects of intensifying contact between Turkish and Dutch",
abstract = "In today’s globalized world movement of people, information and knowledge is made easier each passing day. Thus, isolated, monolingual communities are rare in the modern world. This dissertation looks into bilinguals’ use of their languages within the community of Turkish-Dutch speakers in the Netherlands. It studies recordings of naturally occurring bilingual conversations among friend groups and monolingual interviews with second generation bilinguals. It approaches language as a usage-based system that is entirely made up of units which differ only in their degree of complexity, their degree of schematicity (a continuum from schematic, or open to lexical selection, to specific, or ‘lexically filled’) and in how entrenched they are. The speakers’ use of code-switching as well as the structural and lexical aspects of their Turkish are studied from this usage-based perspective to gain a deeper insight into how factors like frequency of use and semantic specificity affect their language use. The results of the analysis of their everyday in-group use of both Dutch and Turkish is used to reassess the conventional typology of code-switching patterns. Their Turkish is studied in order to assess whether changes that are found, in the form of deviations from Turkish as spoken in Turkey, might be explained by language contact. Contact-induced language change is a relatively new source of empirical data for usage-based linguistics; exploring the combination of theoretical perspective and empirical data allows us to further deepen our understanding of what drives language use and how the changes it makes visible can be explained.",
author = "Derya Demir{\cc}ay",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
isbn = "9789460932724",
series = "Tilburg Dissertations in Culture Studies",
publisher = "LOT",
school = "Tilburg University",

}

Demirçay, D 2017, 'Connected languages: Effects of intensifying contact between Turkish and Dutch', Doctor of Philosophy, Tilburg University, Utrecht.

Connected languages : Effects of intensifying contact between Turkish and Dutch. / Demirçay, Derya.

Utrecht : LOT, 2017. 224 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisScientific

TY - THES

T1 - Connected languages

T2 - Effects of intensifying contact between Turkish and Dutch

AU - Demirçay, Derya

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - In today’s globalized world movement of people, information and knowledge is made easier each passing day. Thus, isolated, monolingual communities are rare in the modern world. This dissertation looks into bilinguals’ use of their languages within the community of Turkish-Dutch speakers in the Netherlands. It studies recordings of naturally occurring bilingual conversations among friend groups and monolingual interviews with second generation bilinguals. It approaches language as a usage-based system that is entirely made up of units which differ only in their degree of complexity, their degree of schematicity (a continuum from schematic, or open to lexical selection, to specific, or ‘lexically filled’) and in how entrenched they are. The speakers’ use of code-switching as well as the structural and lexical aspects of their Turkish are studied from this usage-based perspective to gain a deeper insight into how factors like frequency of use and semantic specificity affect their language use. The results of the analysis of their everyday in-group use of both Dutch and Turkish is used to reassess the conventional typology of code-switching patterns. Their Turkish is studied in order to assess whether changes that are found, in the form of deviations from Turkish as spoken in Turkey, might be explained by language contact. Contact-induced language change is a relatively new source of empirical data for usage-based linguistics; exploring the combination of theoretical perspective and empirical data allows us to further deepen our understanding of what drives language use and how the changes it makes visible can be explained.

AB - In today’s globalized world movement of people, information and knowledge is made easier each passing day. Thus, isolated, monolingual communities are rare in the modern world. This dissertation looks into bilinguals’ use of their languages within the community of Turkish-Dutch speakers in the Netherlands. It studies recordings of naturally occurring bilingual conversations among friend groups and monolingual interviews with second generation bilinguals. It approaches language as a usage-based system that is entirely made up of units which differ only in their degree of complexity, their degree of schematicity (a continuum from schematic, or open to lexical selection, to specific, or ‘lexically filled’) and in how entrenched they are. The speakers’ use of code-switching as well as the structural and lexical aspects of their Turkish are studied from this usage-based perspective to gain a deeper insight into how factors like frequency of use and semantic specificity affect their language use. The results of the analysis of their everyday in-group use of both Dutch and Turkish is used to reassess the conventional typology of code-switching patterns. Their Turkish is studied in order to assess whether changes that are found, in the form of deviations from Turkish as spoken in Turkey, might be explained by language contact. Contact-induced language change is a relatively new source of empirical data for usage-based linguistics; exploring the combination of theoretical perspective and empirical data allows us to further deepen our understanding of what drives language use and how the changes it makes visible can be explained.

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

SN - 9789460932724

T3 - Tilburg Dissertations in Culture Studies

PB - LOT

CY - Utrecht

ER -

Demirçay D. Connected languages: Effects of intensifying contact between Turkish and Dutch. Utrecht: LOT, 2017. 224 p. (Tilburg Dissertations in Culture Studies).