Coping with burns: The role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries

Mark Bosmans, Helma Hofland, Alette de jong, Nancy Van Loey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    47 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected for demographics, the number of surgeries during initial admittance, trait coping styles, and changing levels of health-related quality of life. CSE during initial admission was by far the strongest predictor of both initial PTSD symptoms and degree of symptom change with higher CSE levels associated with lower initial symptoms and a steeper decline of symptoms over time. Of the other variables only avoidant coping was associated with higher initial symptom levels, and only emotional expression associated with greater rate of recovery. Current findings suggest that CSE plays a pivotal role in recovery from posttraumatic stress after a burn injury, even when the role of burn-related impairments is taken into consideration. Implications of findings are discussed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)642-651
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
    Volume38
    Issue number4
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

    Keywords

    • Coping self-efficacy, Posttraumatic stress, Burn patients, Quality of life, Coping, Latent growth curve modeling

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