Correlates and outcomes of worries about hypoglycemia in family members of adults with diabetes: The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study

G.M. Nefs, F. Pouwer, R.I. Holt, S. Skovlund, N. Hermanns, A. Nicolucci, M. Peyrot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Objective
We examined (a) the demographic and clinical correlates of worries about hypoglycemia in adult family members of adults with diabetes, and (b) the association of these worries with measures of diabetes support.
Methods
The second multinational Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study cross-sectionally surveyed 2057 family members from 17 countries. Participants completed questions about demographics, diabetes, and psychosocial functioning, including worry about overall and nocturnal hypoglycemia. Analyses included hierarchical ordinal and linear regression.
Results
Eighty-five percent of family members (n = 1661) were at least occasionally very worried about the risk of hypoglycemic events overall. Correlates of worries about hypoglycemia included female gender, higher age and lower education in the family member, younger age of the person with diabetes and this person being a parent or another adult (versus spouse or partner), insulin or non-insulin injectable treatment, severe or non-severe hypoglycemia in the past 12 months, and family member recognition of hypoglycemia. Elevated worries about hypoglycemia had a significant independent association with increased odds of diabetes-related family arguments and family member frustration in providing helpful support (OR range 1.60–3.72). High levels of worries about hypoglycemia were associated with increased odds of attending diabetes-related health-care visits. Worries about hypoglycemia were not associated with family member involvement in diabetes care. Similar results were found for worries about nocturnal events.
Conclusion
Worries about hypoglycemia were common in family members and were associated with suboptimal diabetes support. This issue therefore deserves increased clinician attention.
Keywords
Diabetes, Family, Hypoglycemia, Worry, Support
Original languageDutch
Pages (from-to)69-77
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume89
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

Cite this

@article{664acd066c2d492ea2780647bd6657e0,
title = "Correlates and outcomes of worries about hypoglycemia in family members of adults with diabetes: The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study",
abstract = "ObjectiveWe examined (a) the demographic and clinical correlates of worries about hypoglycemia in adult family members of adults with diabetes, and (b) the association of these worries with measures of diabetes support.MethodsThe second multinational Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study cross-sectionally surveyed 2057 family members from 17 countries. Participants completed questions about demographics, diabetes, and psychosocial functioning, including worry about overall and nocturnal hypoglycemia. Analyses included hierarchical ordinal and linear regression.ResultsEighty-five percent of family members (n = 1661) were at least occasionally very worried about the risk of hypoglycemic events overall. Correlates of worries about hypoglycemia included female gender, higher age and lower education in the family member, younger age of the person with diabetes and this person being a parent or another adult (versus spouse or partner), insulin or non-insulin injectable treatment, severe or non-severe hypoglycemia in the past 12 months, and family member recognition of hypoglycemia. Elevated worries about hypoglycemia had a significant independent association with increased odds of diabetes-related family arguments and family member frustration in providing helpful support (OR range 1.60–3.72). High levels of worries about hypoglycemia were associated with increased odds of attending diabetes-related health-care visits. Worries about hypoglycemia were not associated with family member involvement in diabetes care. Similar results were found for worries about nocturnal events.ConclusionWorries about hypoglycemia were common in family members and were associated with suboptimal diabetes support. This issue therefore deserves increased clinician attention.KeywordsDiabetes, Family, Hypoglycemia, Worry, Support",
author = "G.M. Nefs and F. Pouwer and R.I. Holt and S. Skovlund and N. Hermanns and A. Nicolucci and M. Peyrot",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpsychores.2016.07.017",
language = "Dutch",
volume = "89",
pages = "69--77",
journal = "Journal of Psychosomatic Research",
issn = "0022-3999",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

Correlates and outcomes of worries about hypoglycemia in family members of adults with diabetes : The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study. / Nefs, G.M.; Pouwer, F.; Holt, R.I.; Skovlund, S.; Hermanns, N.; Nicolucci, A.; Peyrot, M.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Vol. 89, 10.2016, p. 69-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Correlates and outcomes of worries about hypoglycemia in family members of adults with diabetes

T2 - The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study

AU - Nefs, G.M.

AU - Pouwer, F.

AU - Holt, R.I.

AU - Skovlund, S.

AU - Hermanns, N.

AU - Nicolucci, A.

AU - Peyrot, M.

PY - 2016/10

Y1 - 2016/10

N2 - ObjectiveWe examined (a) the demographic and clinical correlates of worries about hypoglycemia in adult family members of adults with diabetes, and (b) the association of these worries with measures of diabetes support.MethodsThe second multinational Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study cross-sectionally surveyed 2057 family members from 17 countries. Participants completed questions about demographics, diabetes, and psychosocial functioning, including worry about overall and nocturnal hypoglycemia. Analyses included hierarchical ordinal and linear regression.ResultsEighty-five percent of family members (n = 1661) were at least occasionally very worried about the risk of hypoglycemic events overall. Correlates of worries about hypoglycemia included female gender, higher age and lower education in the family member, younger age of the person with diabetes and this person being a parent or another adult (versus spouse or partner), insulin or non-insulin injectable treatment, severe or non-severe hypoglycemia in the past 12 months, and family member recognition of hypoglycemia. Elevated worries about hypoglycemia had a significant independent association with increased odds of diabetes-related family arguments and family member frustration in providing helpful support (OR range 1.60–3.72). High levels of worries about hypoglycemia were associated with increased odds of attending diabetes-related health-care visits. Worries about hypoglycemia were not associated with family member involvement in diabetes care. Similar results were found for worries about nocturnal events.ConclusionWorries about hypoglycemia were common in family members and were associated with suboptimal diabetes support. This issue therefore deserves increased clinician attention.KeywordsDiabetes, Family, Hypoglycemia, Worry, Support

AB - ObjectiveWe examined (a) the demographic and clinical correlates of worries about hypoglycemia in adult family members of adults with diabetes, and (b) the association of these worries with measures of diabetes support.MethodsThe second multinational Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study cross-sectionally surveyed 2057 family members from 17 countries. Participants completed questions about demographics, diabetes, and psychosocial functioning, including worry about overall and nocturnal hypoglycemia. Analyses included hierarchical ordinal and linear regression.ResultsEighty-five percent of family members (n = 1661) were at least occasionally very worried about the risk of hypoglycemic events overall. Correlates of worries about hypoglycemia included female gender, higher age and lower education in the family member, younger age of the person with diabetes and this person being a parent or another adult (versus spouse or partner), insulin or non-insulin injectable treatment, severe or non-severe hypoglycemia in the past 12 months, and family member recognition of hypoglycemia. Elevated worries about hypoglycemia had a significant independent association with increased odds of diabetes-related family arguments and family member frustration in providing helpful support (OR range 1.60–3.72). High levels of worries about hypoglycemia were associated with increased odds of attending diabetes-related health-care visits. Worries about hypoglycemia were not associated with family member involvement in diabetes care. Similar results were found for worries about nocturnal events.ConclusionWorries about hypoglycemia were common in family members and were associated with suboptimal diabetes support. This issue therefore deserves increased clinician attention.KeywordsDiabetes, Family, Hypoglycemia, Worry, Support

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2016.07.017

DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2016.07.017

M3 - Article

C2 - 27663113

VL - 89

SP - 69

EP - 77

JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

JF - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

SN - 0022-3999

ER -