Course and predictors of subjective cognitive complaints during the first 12 months after stroke

Mariëlle W.a. Van Rijsbergen, Ruth E. Mark*, Willem J. Kop, Paul L.M. De Kort, Margriet M. Sitskoorn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background:

Subjective Cognitive Complaints (SCC) are common after stroke. This study documents the prevalence and course of SCC in the first year after stroke and determines which patient characteristics in the first 3 months predict subsequent SCC at 1-year follow-up.

Methods:

Using a longitudinal design, 155 patients (mean age 64.0 ± 11.9 years; 69.7% men) were assessed at 3 and 12 months after stroke. SCC were assessed using the Checklist for Cognitive and Emotional consequences following stroke (CLCE) inventory (content component [CLCE-c] and worry component [CLCE-w]). Potential predictors of 12 months SCC included demographics, stroke severity, objective cognitive impairment, psychological factors (depression, anxiety, perceived stress, fatigue, personality traits, coping style), and activities of daily life functioning assessed at 3 months poststroke. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to determine predictors of SCC at 12 months poststroke.

Results:

SCC remained stable from 3 to 12 months over time (CLCE-c from 3.3 ± 2.4 to 3.3 ± 2.6; CLCE-w: from 1.9 ± 2.2 to 2.1 2.5). Independent predictors of SCC at 12 months were baseline CLCE-c (β = 0.54) and perceived stress (β = 0.23) for content, and baseline CLCE-w (β = 0.57) and depressive symptoms (β = 0.23) for worry.

Conclusions:

Patients who report SCC at 3 months after stroke are likely to continue having these complaints at 1 year follow-up. Perceived stress and depressive symptoms additionally increase the likelihood of having SCC at 12 months, independent of SCC at 3 months poststroke. Rehabilitation programs that target reduction of stress and depression in the first months after stroke might reduce sustained SCC and improve well-being.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104588
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2020

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Depression
Equipment and Supplies
Checklist
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cognitive Dysfunction

Cite this

@article{3cbf6df3d58b414bb38df875c4a2e172,
title = "Course and predictors of subjective cognitive complaints during the first 12 months after stroke",
abstract = "Background: Subjective Cognitive Complaints (SCC) are common after stroke. This study documents the prevalence and course of SCC in the first year after stroke and determines which patient characteristics in the first 3 months predict subsequent SCC at 1-year follow-up. Methods: Using a longitudinal design, 155 patients (mean age 64.0 ± 11.9 years; 69.7{\%} men) were assessed at 3 and 12 months after stroke. SCC were assessed using the Checklist for Cognitive and Emotional consequences following stroke (CLCE) inventory (content component [CLCE-c] and worry component [CLCE-w]). Potential predictors of 12 months SCC included demographics, stroke severity, objective cognitive impairment, psychological factors (depression, anxiety, perceived stress, fatigue, personality traits, coping style), and activities of daily life functioning assessed at 3 months poststroke. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to determine predictors of SCC at 12 months poststroke. Results: SCC remained stable from 3 to 12 months over time (CLCE-c from 3.3 ± 2.4 to 3.3 ± 2.6; CLCE-w: from 1.9 ± 2.2 to 2.1 2.5). Independent predictors of SCC at 12 months were baseline CLCE-c (β = 0.54) and perceived stress (β = 0.23) for content, and baseline CLCE-w (β = 0.57) and depressive symptoms (β = 0.23) for worry. Conclusions: Patients who report SCC at 3 months after stroke are likely to continue having these complaints at 1 year follow-up. Perceived stress and depressive symptoms additionally increase the likelihood of having SCC at 12 months, independent of SCC at 3 months poststroke. Rehabilitation programs that target reduction of stress and depression in the first months after stroke might reduce sustained SCC and improve well-being.",
author = "{Van Rijsbergen}, {Mari{\"e}lle W.a.} and Mark, {Ruth E.} and Kop, {Willem J.} and {De Kort}, {Paul L.M.} and Sitskoorn, {Margriet M.}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2019.104588",
language = "English",
pages = "104588",
journal = "Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases",
issn = "1052-3057",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",

}

Course and predictors of subjective cognitive complaints during the first 12 months after stroke. / Van Rijsbergen, Mariëlle W.a.; Mark, Ruth E.; Kop, Willem J.; De Kort, Paul L.M.; Sitskoorn, Margriet M.

In: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, 2020, p. 104588.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Course and predictors of subjective cognitive complaints during the first 12 months after stroke

AU - Van Rijsbergen, Mariëlle W.a.

AU - Mark, Ruth E.

AU - Kop, Willem J.

AU - De Kort, Paul L.M.

AU - Sitskoorn, Margriet M.

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Background: Subjective Cognitive Complaints (SCC) are common after stroke. This study documents the prevalence and course of SCC in the first year after stroke and determines which patient characteristics in the first 3 months predict subsequent SCC at 1-year follow-up. Methods: Using a longitudinal design, 155 patients (mean age 64.0 ± 11.9 years; 69.7% men) were assessed at 3 and 12 months after stroke. SCC were assessed using the Checklist for Cognitive and Emotional consequences following stroke (CLCE) inventory (content component [CLCE-c] and worry component [CLCE-w]). Potential predictors of 12 months SCC included demographics, stroke severity, objective cognitive impairment, psychological factors (depression, anxiety, perceived stress, fatigue, personality traits, coping style), and activities of daily life functioning assessed at 3 months poststroke. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to determine predictors of SCC at 12 months poststroke. Results: SCC remained stable from 3 to 12 months over time (CLCE-c from 3.3 ± 2.4 to 3.3 ± 2.6; CLCE-w: from 1.9 ± 2.2 to 2.1 2.5). Independent predictors of SCC at 12 months were baseline CLCE-c (β = 0.54) and perceived stress (β = 0.23) for content, and baseline CLCE-w (β = 0.57) and depressive symptoms (β = 0.23) for worry. Conclusions: Patients who report SCC at 3 months after stroke are likely to continue having these complaints at 1 year follow-up. Perceived stress and depressive symptoms additionally increase the likelihood of having SCC at 12 months, independent of SCC at 3 months poststroke. Rehabilitation programs that target reduction of stress and depression in the first months after stroke might reduce sustained SCC and improve well-being.

AB - Background: Subjective Cognitive Complaints (SCC) are common after stroke. This study documents the prevalence and course of SCC in the first year after stroke and determines which patient characteristics in the first 3 months predict subsequent SCC at 1-year follow-up. Methods: Using a longitudinal design, 155 patients (mean age 64.0 ± 11.9 years; 69.7% men) were assessed at 3 and 12 months after stroke. SCC were assessed using the Checklist for Cognitive and Emotional consequences following stroke (CLCE) inventory (content component [CLCE-c] and worry component [CLCE-w]). Potential predictors of 12 months SCC included demographics, stroke severity, objective cognitive impairment, psychological factors (depression, anxiety, perceived stress, fatigue, personality traits, coping style), and activities of daily life functioning assessed at 3 months poststroke. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to determine predictors of SCC at 12 months poststroke. Results: SCC remained stable from 3 to 12 months over time (CLCE-c from 3.3 ± 2.4 to 3.3 ± 2.6; CLCE-w: from 1.9 ± 2.2 to 2.1 2.5). Independent predictors of SCC at 12 months were baseline CLCE-c (β = 0.54) and perceived stress (β = 0.23) for content, and baseline CLCE-w (β = 0.57) and depressive symptoms (β = 0.23) for worry. Conclusions: Patients who report SCC at 3 months after stroke are likely to continue having these complaints at 1 year follow-up. Perceived stress and depressive symptoms additionally increase the likelihood of having SCC at 12 months, independent of SCC at 3 months poststroke. Rehabilitation programs that target reduction of stress and depression in the first months after stroke might reduce sustained SCC and improve well-being.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2019.104588

DO - 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2019.104588

M3 - Article

SP - 104588

JO - Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases

JF - Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases

SN - 1052-3057

ER -