Cross-modal representation of spoken and written word meaning in left pars triangularis

Antonietta Gabriella Liuzzi, Rose Bruffaerts, Ronald Peeters, Katarzyna Adamczuk, Emmanuel Keuleers, Simon De Deyne, Gerrit Storms, Patrick Dupont, Rik Vandenberghe*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The correspondence in meaning extracted from written versus spoken input remains to be fully understood neurobiologically. Here, in a total of 38 subjects, the functional anatomy of cross-modal semantic similarity for concrete words was determined based on a dual criterion: First, a voxelwise univariate analysis had to show significant activation during a semantic task (property verification) performed with written and spoken concrete words compared to the perceptually matched control condition. Second, in an independent dataset, in these clusters, the similarity in fMRI response pattern to two distinct entities, one presented as a written and the other as a spoken word, had to correlate with the similarity in meaning between these entities. The left ventral occipitotemporal transition zone and ventromedial temporal cortex, retrosplenial cortex, pars orbitalis bilaterally, and the left pars triangularis were all activated in the univariate contrast. Only the left pars triangularis showed a cross-modal semantic similarity effect. There was no effect of phonological nor orthographic similarity in this region. The cross-modal semantic similarity effect was confirmed by a secondary analysis in the cytoarchitectonically defined BA45. A semantic similarity effect was also present in the ventral occipital regions but only within the visual modality, and in the anterior superior temporal cortex only within the auditory modality. This study provides direct evidence for the coding of word meaning in BA45 and positions its contribution to semantic processing at the confluence of input-modality specific pathways that code for meaning within the respective input modalities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-307
Number of pages16
JournalNeuroimage
Volume150
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Apr 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • INFERIOR PREFRONTAL CORTEX
  • TEMPORAL-LOBE
  • ANGULAR GYRUS
  • FUNCTIONAL SPECIALIZATION
  • CYTOARCHITECTONIC MAPS
  • SENTENCE COMPREHENSION
  • SEMANTIC SIMILARITY
  • LANGUAGE PATHWAYS
  • FRONTAL GYRUS
  • NEURAL BASIS

Cite this

Liuzzi, A. G., Bruffaerts, R., Peeters, R., Adamczuk, K., Keuleers, E., De Deyne, S., ... Vandenberghe, R. (2017). Cross-modal representation of spoken and written word meaning in left pars triangularis. Neuroimage, 150, 292-307. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.02.032
Liuzzi, Antonietta Gabriella ; Bruffaerts, Rose ; Peeters, Ronald ; Adamczuk, Katarzyna ; Keuleers, Emmanuel ; De Deyne, Simon ; Storms, Gerrit ; Dupont, Patrick ; Vandenberghe, Rik. / Cross-modal representation of spoken and written word meaning in left pars triangularis. In: Neuroimage. 2017 ; Vol. 150. pp. 292-307.
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abstract = "The correspondence in meaning extracted from written versus spoken input remains to be fully understood neurobiologically. Here, in a total of 38 subjects, the functional anatomy of cross-modal semantic similarity for concrete words was determined based on a dual criterion: First, a voxelwise univariate analysis had to show significant activation during a semantic task (property verification) performed with written and spoken concrete words compared to the perceptually matched control condition. Second, in an independent dataset, in these clusters, the similarity in fMRI response pattern to two distinct entities, one presented as a written and the other as a spoken word, had to correlate with the similarity in meaning between these entities. The left ventral occipitotemporal transition zone and ventromedial temporal cortex, retrosplenial cortex, pars orbitalis bilaterally, and the left pars triangularis were all activated in the univariate contrast. Only the left pars triangularis showed a cross-modal semantic similarity effect. There was no effect of phonological nor orthographic similarity in this region. The cross-modal semantic similarity effect was confirmed by a secondary analysis in the cytoarchitectonically defined BA45. A semantic similarity effect was also present in the ventral occipital regions but only within the visual modality, and in the anterior superior temporal cortex only within the auditory modality. This study provides direct evidence for the coding of word meaning in BA45 and positions its contribution to semantic processing at the confluence of input-modality specific pathways that code for meaning within the respective input modalities.",
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Liuzzi, AG, Bruffaerts, R, Peeters, R, Adamczuk, K, Keuleers, E, De Deyne, S, Storms, G, Dupont, P & Vandenberghe, R 2017, 'Cross-modal representation of spoken and written word meaning in left pars triangularis', Neuroimage, vol. 150, pp. 292-307. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.02.032

Cross-modal representation of spoken and written word meaning in left pars triangularis. / Liuzzi, Antonietta Gabriella; Bruffaerts, Rose; Peeters, Ronald; Adamczuk, Katarzyna; Keuleers, Emmanuel; De Deyne, Simon; Storms, Gerrit; Dupont, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik.

In: Neuroimage, Vol. 150, 15.04.2017, p. 292-307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - Liuzzi, Antonietta Gabriella

AU - Bruffaerts, Rose

AU - Peeters, Ronald

AU - Adamczuk, Katarzyna

AU - Keuleers, Emmanuel

AU - De Deyne, Simon

AU - Storms, Gerrit

AU - Dupont, Patrick

AU - Vandenberghe, Rik

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KW - SEMANTIC SIMILARITY

KW - LANGUAGE PATHWAYS

KW - FRONTAL GYRUS

KW - NEURAL BASIS

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