Crossing Lenses: Policing’s new visibility and the role of ‘smartphone journalism’ as a form of freedom-preserving reciprocal surveillance

Bryce Newell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Citizens recording police (a form of “sousveillance”) has become increasingly common in recent years. Citizen media can have a substantial impact on policing and police image management – and thus effect public perceptions of police legitimacy. On the other hand, police departments are increasingly utilizing sophisticated visual surveillance technologies, such as officer-mounted wearable cameras, to document police-citizen encounters. This paper examines, theoretically, the role that citizen media should play as a liberty-preserving form of reciprocal transparency, what forms of respect ought to be owed by camera-wielding citizens to the police officers and other subjects of their recordings in public spaces.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-105
Number of pages46
JournalUniversity of Illinois Journal of Law, Technology & Policy
Volume2014
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

Keywords

  • surveillance
  • sousveillance
  • Police
  • citizen media
  • citizen video
  • law
  • body cameras
  • privacy

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