Crying in borderline personality disorder patients

M. Peter, A. Arntz, Th. Klimstra, A. Vingerhoets

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Emotion dysregulation and hyperreactivity are considered central features of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). We assumed that such emotion dysregulation is also reflected in increased crying behavior of these patients and, consequently, hypothesized that BPD patients (N = 62), compared to Cluster C personality disorder patients (Cluster C-PD; N = 25) and non-patients (N = 54), would show higher scores on crying measures. To evaluate crying behavior, we used a set of specially designed tools. Compared to non-patients, BPD patients showed the anticipated higher crying frequency despite a similar crying proneness and ways of dealing with tears. They also reported less awareness of the influence of crying on others. However, Cluster C-PD patients showed a very similar pattern of findings. Overall, our results suggest that the increased crying of BPD patients likely results from environmental factors or the misperception of situations, rather than from stable traits. Remarkable is that the observed discrepancies in crying behavior compared to non-patients seem to be similar for Cluster-C PDs and BPD
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-107
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume273
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Crying

Keywords

  • 5-FACTOR MODEL
  • ADULTS
  • AFFECTIVE INSTABILITY
  • ATTACHMENT
  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Cluster C personality disorder
  • Crying
  • EMOTION RECOGNITION
  • Hyperreactivity
  • IMPULSIVITY
  • INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES
  • REACTIVITY
  • RESPONSES
  • TEARS

Cite this

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title = "Crying in borderline personality disorder patients",
abstract = "Emotion dysregulation and hyperreactivity are considered central features of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). We assumed that such emotion dysregulation is also reflected in increased crying behavior of these patients and, consequently, hypothesized that BPD patients (N = 62), compared to Cluster C personality disorder patients (Cluster C-PD; N = 25) and non-patients (N = 54), would show higher scores on crying measures. To evaluate crying behavior, we used a set of specially designed tools. Compared to non-patients, BPD patients showed the anticipated higher crying frequency despite a similar crying proneness and ways of dealing with tears. They also reported less awareness of the influence of crying on others. However, Cluster C-PD patients showed a very similar pattern of findings. Overall, our results suggest that the increased crying of BPD patients likely results from environmental factors or the misperception of situations, rather than from stable traits. Remarkable is that the observed discrepancies in crying behavior compared to non-patients seem to be similar for Cluster-C PDs and BPD",
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Crying in borderline personality disorder patients. / Peter, M.; Arntz, A.; Klimstra, Th.; Vingerhoets, A.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 273, 2019, p. 100-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - Peter, M.

AU - Arntz, A.

AU - Klimstra, Th.

AU - Vingerhoets, A.

PY - 2019

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AB - Emotion dysregulation and hyperreactivity are considered central features of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). We assumed that such emotion dysregulation is also reflected in increased crying behavior of these patients and, consequently, hypothesized that BPD patients (N = 62), compared to Cluster C personality disorder patients (Cluster C-PD; N = 25) and non-patients (N = 54), would show higher scores on crying measures. To evaluate crying behavior, we used a set of specially designed tools. Compared to non-patients, BPD patients showed the anticipated higher crying frequency despite a similar crying proneness and ways of dealing with tears. They also reported less awareness of the influence of crying on others. However, Cluster C-PD patients showed a very similar pattern of findings. Overall, our results suggest that the increased crying of BPD patients likely results from environmental factors or the misperception of situations, rather than from stable traits. Remarkable is that the observed discrepancies in crying behavior compared to non-patients seem to be similar for Cluster-C PDs and BPD

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